25 Upcoming Events

The Battle for Syria, Yale University Press, 2016

Yale University Press

Seminar - Open to the Public

Book Talk: Syria’s Civil War and the Post-American Middle East

Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Nye A, 5th Floor

A seminar with Christopher Phillips, Senior Lecturer in the International Relations of the Middle East at Queen Mary, University of London and an Associate Fellow at the Chatham House Middle East and North Africa programme on his latest book The Battle for Syria: International Rivalry in the New Middle East. Moderated by Stephen Walt, Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs, HKS.

Protest in Tehran against execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr in 2016.

Wikimedia Commons

Seminar - Open to the Public

Saudi Arabia and Iran: Rivalry and Fragmentation after the Arab Uprisings

Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Simon Mabon (Lecturer, Lancaster University), will explore the rivalry between two major Gulf powers, Saudi Arabia and Iran, after the Arab Uprisings. With the fragmentation of a number of states across the region in 2011 and political dynamics challenged in a range of different ways, Riyadh and Tehran found opportunities to improve their standing across the Middle East, often in zero sum ways. Moderated by Iran Project Director Payam Mohseni.

Europe

Wikimedia Commons

Special Series - Open to the Public

EUROPE WEEK: A project under threat?: The 2017 European elections and the future of the European Union

Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor

As professed isolationist Donald Trump settles in to the White House and the United Kingdom prepares to trigger Article 50, the European Union has been cast as the 'last defender of the liberal world order.'  However, as core EU states Germany and France prepare for federal elections in 2017, the influence of populist, Eurosceptic parties in these and other nations could impact the cohesion of the European Union as a whole.

German diplomat Boris Ruge and French scholar Muriel Rouyer will discuss transatlantic influences, domestic politics, and EU governance in this context on a panel moderated by FDP Faculty Director Nicholas Burns.

Speakers:

Ambassador Boris Ruge

Deputy Head of Mission, German Embassy to the US

 

Dr. Muriel Rouyer

Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

 

Moderated by Nicholas Burns

Faculty Director, Future of Diplomacy Project

Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations

Seminar - Open to the Public

The History of Cyber and Intelligence Operations

Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 | 5:15pm - 6:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Nye A, 5th Floor

Please join us for a panel discussion with Command Historian Dr. Michael Warner and Historian of GCHQ Professor Richard Aldrich, moderated by the International Security Program's Dr. Calder Walton and the Cyber Security Project's Director Dr. Michael Sulmeyer. This event is open to the public, but seating and admittance will be offered on a first come, first served basis.

European migrant crisis

Vimeo

Special Series - Open to the Public

EUROPE WEEK: Transatlantic perspectives on migration, radicalization, and security

Tue., Feb. 28, 2017 | 8:30am - 10:00am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor

As European states continue to struggle with high levels of immigration and US policymakers respond to the effects of President Trump’s contested executive order, the issue of migration has become increasingly politicized in recent years. How are receiving countries in Europe coping? How should one evaluate the measures taken by European governments on securing their borders and addressing refugee resettlement within the EU and with other partners, particularly Turkey? What successful strategies for immigrant integration are being shared by communities and national governments across the Atlantic? In light of increasing security concerns associated with migrant arrivals, how are governments addressing the isolation and potential for radicalization of new arrivals and resident migrants?

Experts Gregory Maniatis, Jytte Klausen and Adam Hunter will endeavor to cut through the charged public discourse around these topics by offering a practitioner’s perspective on immigration and security policy on both sides of the Atlantic. Future of Diplomacy Project Executive Director Cathryn Cluver moderates.

Speakers:

Mr. Gregory Maniatis

Advisor to Peter Sutherland, UN Special Representative for Migration

 

Dr. Jytte Klausen

Lawrence A. Wien Professor of International Relations

Brandeis University

 

Mr. Adam Hunter

Director, Immigration and the States

Pew Charitable Trusts

 

Moderated by Cathryn Clüver

Executive Director, Future of Diplomacy Project

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

“Homeland Security and Crisis Management Under Trump” - A Conversation with former DHS Chief of Staff Paul Rosen

Tue., Feb. 28, 2017 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Nye A, 5th Floor

What will the U.S. government’s third largest cabinet department look like under Trump? The Homeland Security Project will host a conversation with former DHS Chief of Staff Paul Rosen, assessing how the Trump administration’s Department of Homeland Security will handle crisis management and other national security challenges.

Lunch will be served. Please RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/Eo6KJRPdwZEoTsaS2

event

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, and Staff

Belfer Center Student and Fellow Discussion On National Security in the Age of Trump with Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies, CFR

Tue., Feb. 28, 2017 | 2:00pm - 3:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs will host a Student and Fellow Discussion with Max Boot. The discussion will take place in the Belfer Library, and space is limited.  

Max Boot is a military historian and foreign-policy analyst who has been called one of the “world’s leading authorities on armed conflict” by the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Max Boot’s latest book—The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam—is due out in early 2018 from Norton/Liveright.

In this Jan. 18, 2012 file photo, an anti-government protester stands in front of riot police while photographing other demonstrators in Manama, Bahrain.

AP Photo/Hasan Jamali

Seminar - Open to the Public

Transition in Regime, State, and Society in the Arab World

Tue., Feb. 28, 2017 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

A seminar with Shafeeq Ghabra, Professor of Political Science, Kuwait University and founding President of Jusoor Arabiya.

Dr. Ghabra will talk about the challenges facing the Arab world today and identify these challenges in the context of the existing civil wars, violence, and injustices. The region will not be able to move away from the existing collapse without a new social political order that focuses on education, political and economic reforms, accountability of rulers, separation of powers, freedom of expression and justice.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Fuel Cycles, Fissile Materials and Force Postures: A Case Study of Pakistan

Wed., Mar. 1, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

This seminar will analyze Pakistan's existing and projected nuclear fuel cycle capabilities and their effect on the country’s nuclear posture. Pakistan has been producing HEU since the mid-1980s and following the commissioning of the first production reactor in 1998, the country has expanded its plutonium production and reprocessing capabilities to meet the needs of a credible deterrent, comprising twelve types of ballistic and cruise missiles—which now form a strategic triad. While these capabilities have been progressively built over four decades and are modest in comparison to emerging capabilities in the region, Pakistan is viewed as having the world’s fastest growing nuclear arsenal. Resource constraints and the requirements of maintaining a credible conventional deterrence, coupled with the evolving threat spectrum will determine the future direction and scope of its strategic force posture.