International Relations

416 Items

President Donald Trump meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 Summit, Saturday, July 8, 2017, in Hamburg, Germany. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - London Evening Standard

Can America and China avoid going to war in the future?

| July 13, 2017

Less than three months after declaring that he had “great confidence” China would rein in North Korean belligerence, President Trump ranted on Twitter last week, “Trade between China and North Korea grew almost 40 per cent in the first quarter. So much for China working with us — but we had to give it a try!” Losing patience with China, Trump may take unilateral, even military, action against North Korea’s nuclear programme. Could this escalate into a second Korean War? 

China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) Gen. Li Zuocheng, left, and U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, center, review an honor guard during a welcome ceremony at the Bayi Building in Beijing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool)

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Is war between a rising China and a dominant America inevitable? A thought experiment.

| June 28, 2017

Chinese analysts, from President Xi Jinping on down, have nominally rejected Allison’s pessimistic analysis. “There is no Thucydides Trap,” Xi has argued, claiming that he had devised an alternative “new type of great-power relations” that would avoid war by recognizing that each Asian giant had its own legitimate interests. More recently, he has shifted to arguing that “China and the U.S. must do everything possible to avoid [the] Thucydides Trap.”

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump pose for a photo with Chinese President Xi Jingping and his wife, Mrs. Peng Liyuan, Thursday, April 6, 2017, at the entrance of Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, FL (Official White Photo by D. Myles Cullen)

Official White Photo by D. Myles Cullen

Magazine Article - The Atlantic

What Xi Jinping Wants

| May 31, 2017

"Within a month of becoming China’s leader in 2012, Xi specified deadlines for meeting each of his 'Two Centennial Goals.' First, China will build a 'moderately prosperous society' by doubling its 2010 per capita GDP to $10,000 by 2021, when it celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party. Second, it will become a 'fully developed, rich, and powerful' nation by the 100th anniversary of the People's Republic in 2049. If China reaches the first goal— which it is on course to do—the IMF estimates that its economy will be 40 percent larger than that of the U.S. (measured in terms of purchasing power parity). If China meets the second target by 2049, its economy will be triple America's."

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, center, walks with his Indonesian counterpart Jusuf Kalla, right, and top security minister Wiranto, left, after their meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, April 20, 2017. Indonesia is the latest stop on an Asian tour by Pence that is reinforcing traditional U.S. alliances at a time when Donald Trump's presidency has raised questions about the strength of the U.S. commitment to the region.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - The Straits Times

Pence's Visit to Indonesia a Good Signal for Southeast Asia

| Apr. 25, 2017

"United States Vice-President Mike Pence's visit to Indonesia last week marked a welcome statement of American confidence in Indonesia and, by extension, South-east Asia.

"It is clear that, following a bruising presidential campaign and the first few wobbly weeks in power, the Trump presidency has embarked on a journey of recognition: both of itself as the pre-eminent global power, and of the stakes which regions and countries have in its ability to carry out its historical responsibilities."

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Correspondence: How Good Are China’s Antiaccess/ Area-Denial Capabilities

| Spring 2017

Andrew S. Erickson; Evan Braden Montgomery; and Craig Neuman respond to Stephen Biddle and Ivan Oelrich's Summer 2016 article, "Future Warfare in the Western Pacific: Chinese Antiaccess/Area Denial, U.S. AirSea Battle, and Command of the Commons in East Asia."

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, with their wives, first lady Melania Trump and Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan are seated during a dinner at Mar-a-Lago, Thursday, April 6, 2017, in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner are seated at left. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The most important economic challenge that China poses

| Apr. 09, 2017

Focusing on China’s trade deficit with the United States is largely misguided. Yes, China subsidizes various exports to the rest of the world in a number of ways. But if the United States succeeds in stopping the subsidies or blocking the subsidized products, the result will be that companies will shift production to Vietnam and other low-wage countries—not create good jobs in the United States.

A currency trader calculates Malaysian ringgit notes at a currency exchange store in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

(AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Addicted to Dollars

| Mar. 02, 2017

Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.

In this Jan. 27, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump, left, listens as Defense Secretary James Mattis, right, speaks at the Pentagon in Washington. With Republicans in charge of Congress, President Donald Trump’s pledge to boost the Pentagon’s budget by tens of billions of dollars should be a sure bet. It’s not. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump is right to spend more on defense. Here’s how to do so wisely.

| Mar. 01, 2017

The bulk of any additional defense investment must focus on maintaining and extending our technological and warfighting edge, including in cyber, electronic and anti-submarine arenas, unmanned systems, automation, long-range striking and protected communications. U.S. military leaders should moderate their appetite for a bigger force today to protect critical investments in cutting-edge capabilities that will determine whether we succeed on the battlefield tomorrow.

Demolition

Picture Alliance

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Trump & Co. Demolition

| Feb. 02, 2017

America and the world have yet to see the likes of this: a newly elected administration that is setting out with manic energy to destroy in mere days what took decades to build. Perhaps the most important and, for friends of the United States, the most painful collateral damage: America’s standing as the world’s moral leader defending democracy, human rights, the rights of minorities and transparency.