2640 Items

Pixabay

Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

Watch Out for the Blowback of Secondary Sanctions on North Korea

| Apr. 28, 2017

While tensions continue to flare along the Korean peninsula, the Trump administration struggles to articulate its strategy to persuade North Korea to halt its nuclear program. In a recent visit to the de-militarized zone, Vice President Pence warned Pyongyang to not test America’s “strength and resolve,” citing recent U.S. military strikes in Syria and Afghanistan as a forewarning. A not-so-veiled threat that the Trump administration considers “all options” to be on the table. What is unknown, however, is whether this increased rhetoric is merely saber-rattling or is the opening salvo for a true shift from Obama’s doctrine of “strategic patience.” That is, continuing to apply political and economic pressure until Pyongyang returns to the negotiating table.

Journal Article - Science and Engineering Ethics

On Effectiveness and Legitimacy of 'Shaming' as a Strategy for Combatting Climate Change

| Forthcoming

While states have agreed to substantial reduction of emissions in the Paris Agreement, the success of the Agreement strongly depends on the cooperation of large Multinational Corporations. Short of legal obligations, the authors discuss the effectiveness and moral legitimacy of voluntary approaches based on naming and shaming. They argue that effectiveness and legitimacy are closely tied together; as voluntary approaches are the only alternative to legally imposed duties, they are most morally defensible particularly if they would be the most effective in reducing the harmful greenhouse gases

Journal Article - Progress in Nuclear Energy

By Accident or by Design? Pushing Global Governance of Nuclear Safety

| August 2017

Nuclear safety governance should move towards a more robust regime including elements of international monitoring and verification. This is needed because nuclear energy production is likely to grow and new reactors will have different global dispersal, veering towards less experienced countries. In addition, there is growing interest in international and multilateral collaboration on disposal of mounting nuclear waste.

Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017.

Wong Maye-E/AP

Analysis & Opinions - Defense One

Scuttle the Iran Nuke Deal? That Approach Didn’t Stop North Korea

| Apr. 26, 2017

“The Trump administration is currently conducting across the entire government a review of our Iran policy,” U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced on April 19, adding that “an unchecked Iran has the potential to follow the same path as North Korea and take the world along with it.” Ironically, the Trump administration appears to be following the same path on Iran as George W. Bush did on North Korea. The result could be equally dangerous.

By undermining implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA — a viable, verified, and sound agreement that blocks Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons — President Trump risks removing the shackles from Tehran’s nuclear efforts. We’ve been down that road before; instead of preserving and strengthening the Agreed Framework with North Korea, Bush freed Pyongyang to keep working on nuclear weapons that could eventually reach American territory.

Journal Article - Nature Human Behaviour

Climate Change May Alter Human Physical Activity Patterns

| 2017

Regular physical activity supports healthy human functioning. Might climate change—by modifying the environmental determinants of human physical activity—alter exercise rates in the future? The authors conduct an empirical investigation of the relationship between meteorological conditions, physical activity, and future climate change

Science March Washington D.C.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

Science's Role in Society is Threatened. Protest is the Right Response

| Apr. 22, 2017

"In recent years we’ve seen an increasing number of influential politicians reject well-established science on climate change, evolution, vaccines, gun violence. The value of government investments in research (particularly basic research) is being called into question — as is whether leaders of government need advice from scientists at all. These attitudes have been most evident in the first 100 days of the Trump administration."

March for Science and Banner in Washington, D.C.

AP

News - American Association for the Advancement of Science

Holdren Outlines Ways to 'Restore Science to Its Rightful Place'

    Author:
  • Anne Q. Hoy
| Apr. 21, 2017

"The scientific community needs to more effectively speak out about the necessity of evidence-based policies, scientific integrity protections and public access to research to defend the role of science, said John Holdren, former White House science adviser, in a speech on the eve of the April 22nd March for Science."

Paper - Centre for International Governance Innovation

Getting beyond Norms: When Violating the Agreement Becomes Customary Practice

| Apr. 20, 2017

This paper offers five standards of care that can be used to test individual states' true commitment to the international norms of behaviour. Only with a concerted and coordinated effort across the global community will it be possible to change the new normal of "anything goes" and move forward to ensure the future safety and security of the Internet and Internet-based infrastructures.

U.S. Capitol

Kevin McCoy CC

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Some Thoughts on the Scientists' March

| Apr. 19, 2017

Understandable concerns have been expressed by some in the scientific community that marching on April 22 will make scientists look like "just another interest group" or "just worried about their jobs" or that they will be seen as "politicizing science." After considerable reflection and discussion with a number of science-community leaders, John P. Holdren, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at Harvard University has reached the following conclusions about this issue. 

MIssile

Kelly Michals

Journal Article - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

The political and military vulnerability of America’s land-based nuclear missiles

| Apr. 18, 2017

The current plan for US nuclear modernization would replace the nation’s aging Minuteman III missiles with next-generation missiles known as the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent, at a cost of $100 billion or more. As part of the agreement that resulted in the Senate’s approval of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty nuclear agreement with the Russian Federation, the Obama administration agreed to a nuclear modernization plan that includes retaining and upgrading the nation’s intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs).