992 Events

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Sahel, the Rift, and the Horn, A Comparative Study of African Jihadists

Thu., Apr. 6, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Stig Jarle Hansen, Research Fellow, International Security Program

It is now over 16 years since the September 11th attack and the initiation of the so-called "war on terror," yet in Africa, none of the allies of Al Qaeda or the Islamic State have been defeated. This seminar bases itself on a comparative study of sub-Saharan jihadist organizations. The main argument is that the resilience of the organizations partly emerges because of lack of understanding of the relationship between the organizations and the territories in which they operate. Countering Violent Extremism and counter strategies have to be adjusted to the type of control these organizations wield in their area of operations.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Reconciling Strategic Stability Disconnects with China

Thu., Mar. 30, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Barry Little, Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

The speaker will discuss U.S. and Chinese perspectives on strategic stability, sticking points in the nuclear relationship, and recommendations on how to bolster stability.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Asia-Pacific Nuclear Governance: Feeble, Fragmented but Fixable?

Wed., Mar. 29, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Nuclear governance at the regional level in Asia-Pacific is alarmingly fragmented and feeble. An array of disparate, small bodies with varying memberships seek to address safety, security, nonproliferation, and disarmament, but without adding much to the global arrangements. Dr. Findlay will examine the future likely trajectory of nuclear energy in the region, the regional drivers of and constraints on strengthened regional governance, and the likelihood of a comprehensive, integrated nuclear governance regime emerging.

May 8, 1993: President Clinton participating in a Bosnia situation meeting in the White House Roosevelt Room with Secretary of State Warren Christopher, Secretary of Defense Les Aspin, Vice President Gore, National Security Advisor Tony Lake, and others.

William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Seminar - Open to the Public

The American Presidency in Response to Mass Atrocities, 1915–1995

Thu., Mar. 23, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 402

Speaker: Amanda J. Rothschild, Research Fellow, International Security Program

The U.S. response to mass killings abroad has been the subject of frequent debate and critique. Critics argue that the United States has failed to adequately apply its immense military and soft power to halt these massacres throughout history. Conventional arguments suggest that a lack of "political will" for engagement has led to limited responsiveness. Yet scholars and policymakers still understand very little about what specifically contributes to "political will," and why the United States does change policy to respond more forcefully in certain cases. Drawing on historical materials collected from research at eight archives, this seminar will offer a theory of presidential decision-making in response to mass killing, illuminating the historical factors that typically lead to changes in policy and uncovering dramatic stories of internal government infighting, secret deliberations, and cover-ups, as various administrations have struggled to define their policy response.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Japan, South Korea, and the U.S. Nuclear Umbrella

Tue., Mar. 21, 2017 | 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Center for Government and International Studies - Knafel Building, Bowie-Vernon, Room K262

Speaker: Terence RoehrigProfessor of National Security Affairs and Director, Asia-Pacific Studies Group, U.S. Naval War College; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Moderator: Stephen Peter Rosen, Beton Michael Kaneb Professor of National Security and Military Affairs, Department of Government, and Harvard College Professor, Harvard University.

For close to 60 years, the United States has maintained an extended deterrence commitment to protect Japan and South Korea that has included inclusion under the U.S. nuclear umbrella. While a central part of defense planning for these countries, how likely is it that the United States would ever use nuclear weapons to defend Japan or South Korea? Though the alliances are strong and the United States would defend its two allies if attacked, it is highly unlikely to use nuclear weapons to do so, relying instead on conventional weapons. In many respects, the nuclear umbrella is more important as a political signal demonstrating the level of commitment to the allies' defense as well as a non-proliferation tool to keep both from acquiring their own nuclear weapons. Yet despite the low credibility of the nuclear umbrella, even a relatively low likelihood of nuclear use continues to have some deterrent effect on North Korea and China. This seminar will examine the history of the U.S. nuclear umbrella for Japan and South Korea, the role the umbrella plays in Japanese, South Korean, and U.S. security planning, and questions regarding the credibility of the commitment.

Oct. 25, 2012 - A SM-2 Block IIIA missile is launched from the USS Fitzgerald during the FTI-01 flight test.

Creative Commons

Seminar - Open to the Public

In the Shadow of the Umbrella: U.S. Extended Deterrence and Nuclear Proliferation in East Asia, 1961–1979

Thu., Mar. 16, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The United States has been remarkably successful at using the security guarantee as a non-proliferation tool, but during the Cold War, three countries — Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan — were in danger of slipping out from under the U.S. nuclear umbrella. Why did these states feel the need to start down the nuclear path, despite being under the protective wing of its nuclear-armed superpower ally? Relying on declassified national security archival documents, this seminar sheds light on the interplay between alliance dynamics and nuclear weapons decision making.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Nuclear Weapons and Coercive Diplomacy

Thu., Mar. 9, 2017 | 2:00pm - 3:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Are nuclear weapons useful for coercive diplomacy? Since 1945, most strategic thinking about nuclear weapons has focused on deterrence - using nuclear threats to prevent attacks against the nation's territory and interests. But an often overlooked question is whether nuclear threats can also coerce adversaries to relinquish possessions or change their behavior. Can nuclear weapons be used to blackmail other countries? The prevailing wisdom is that nuclear weapons are useful for coercion, but this book shows that this view is badly misguided. Nuclear weapons are useful mainly for deterrence and self-defense, not for coercion. The authors evaluate the role of nuclear weapons in several foreign policy contexts and present a trove of new quantitative and historical evidence that nuclear weapons do not help countries achieve better results in coercive diplomacy. The evidence is clear: the benefits of possessing nuclear weapons are almost exclusively defensive, not offensive.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Chinese Communists in Capitalist Markets: International Commerce and the Rise of "New China," 1949–1960

Thu., Mar. 9, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Jason M. Kelly, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

This seminar will explore the paradoxical phenomenon of commercial ties between Mao's China and international capitalism during the founding years of the People's Republic of China. By bringing this overlooked dimension of communist China's early foreign relations to light, this seminar offers key historical context for understanding China's "rise" today and its implications for the future of international order and stability.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

Inheriting the Bomb: Soviet Collapse and Nuclear Disarmament of Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan

Wed., Mar. 8, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

The disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the world's largest nuclear arsenal of some 29,000 nuclear weapons, under the sovereign power of four new states: the Russian Federation, Belarus, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan. While Russia succeeded the Soviet Union as a recognized nuclear power, the status of nuclear weapons in the three non-Russian states was more ambiguous. Whose weapons were they, what claims could these new states convincingly and legitimately make in relation to the nuclear weapons on their territory, and who would carry out Soviet Union’s arms control obligations under START I and NPT? The presentation explores how the deliberations and decisions made during and immediately after the Soviet collapse framed much of the ensuring negotiations over the fate of Soviet nuclear legacy, leading, in the end, to the denuclearization of Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan. 

Seminar - Open to the Public

Building a Fortress: The Role of Scientists in India's Nuclear Policymaking (1947–1974)

Thu., Mar. 2, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: JI Yeon-jung, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

RESCHEDULED FROM FEBRUARY 9, 2017

How did scientists successfully convince political leaders to pursue India’s nuclear program and to approve the peaceful nuclear explosion in 1974? What mechanism and rationale did they establish? Examining the case of India’s nuclear policy toward nuclear experimentation in 1974, this seminar presents how scientists attempted to stylize India’s nuclear policy in light of the changing dynamics of science and politics.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.