1001 Events

"No chance to criticize." Uncle Sam sits at a table on which is a small cake on a platter labeled "Cuba," with a decanter labeled "Philippine Islands" on the table and a bottle labeled "Porto Rico" in an ice bucket. On the left, John Bull (Britain) and other colonial powers hold swords slicing a large cake on a platter labeled "China." John Bull (to the Powers): "What are you mad about? We can't grudge him a light lunch while we are feasting!"

Library of Congress

Seminar - Open to the Public

Cancelled: "'Influence' Disappears; Territory Remains": Living and Dying Nations in 1898

Thu., May 18, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Ben Rhode, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

This seminar is cancelled.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Human Resources of Non-State Armed Groups

Thu., May 4, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Vera Mironova, Research Fellow, International Security Program

The speaker will discuss the labor market of non-state armed groups on the ground and at the leadership level, focusing on recruitment, retention, and turnover. 

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the BRICS summit, July 8, 2015

Creative Commons kremlin.ru

Seminar - Open to the Public

Chinese and Russian Approaches to International Law vs. U.S. Visions of Global Order

Thu., Apr. 27, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

This seminar will present a comparative assessment of Chinese and Russian approaches to the international legal and security architecture stood up by the United States after World War II, beginning with a historical overview of the emergence of the concept of "international law."

Seminar - Open to the Public

India and the NSG

Wed., Apr. 26, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Ji Yeon-jung, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

This seminar will examine India’s strategy, agenda setting, and coalition-building to gain membership to the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) as well as India’s broad efforts to build a reputation as a major stakeholder in the nuclear nonproliferation regime as a de facto nuclear weapons state. For the last two decades, India has been steadily working to gain international acceptance of its de facto nuclear status. Following the Indo-US nuclear deal in 2008, India concluded eleven civil nuclear agreements creating an unofficial forum for India’s bid for membership in the NSG. Although India’s setback to its NSG bid at the Vienna meeting in November 2016 highlighted the challenges that India must continue to address, Ji Yeon-jung will argue that the number of achievements and engagements that New Delhi addressed in the past few years explicitly demonstrates India’s transitional status in the changing global nuclear order.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Does it Matter? Military Training and Insurgent Fighting Capacity

Thu., Apr. 20, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The speaker will demonstrate the importance of military training by drawing on archival documents and a rich historiography to comparatively trace the development of three separate elements of the Communist fighting force in Vietnam during the Second Indochina War (1961–1975): the forces of the North Vietnamese Regime, or the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN), as well as two groups within the southern resistance of the People's Liberation Armed Front (PLAF, also known as the Việt Cộng or VC): Main Force units and Guerrilla Force units.

Two Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) under construction at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant, India.

IAEA Imagebank

Seminar - Open to the Public

Nonproliferation and Security Implications of the Evolving Civil Nuclear Export Market

Wed., Apr. 19, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

In recent decades, the global nuclear export market has observed a marked shift of demand from traditional customers in the Western world to developing countries, especially in Asia. At the same time, there has been a consequential decrease in industrial and financial capabilities among the once-dominant nuclear suppliers from the United States, France, and Japan. On the other hand, Russia has signed numerous contracts to introduce nuclear technology to new customers, and China will likely become another major player in this competition. In this presentation, Viet Phuong Nguyen will discuss the nonproliferation and security risks associated with the introduction of new nuclear suppliers and new recipients with lesser governance capabilities, with a focus on the implementation of safeguards and export control measures. A new contribution scheme for IAEA safeguards, and enhanced participation in the nonproliferation and export control regimes are proposed to address the potential risks of the “old” and the “new” nuclear exporters in the market, as well as the rise of the new customers.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Loyalty or Disavowal: Explaining Affiliation and Defection of Al-Qa’ida Allies to Islamic State

Thu., Apr. 13, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Christopher Anzalone, Research Fellow, International Security Program

Drawing on collected jihadi-insurgent primary source materials and group histories, this seminar examines the organizational and local dynamics at play within regional Sunni jihadi-insurgent organizations to explain why and when there have been defections and shifts in loyalty from Al-Qa'ida and its regional affiliates to Islamic State.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Sahel, the Rift, and the Horn: A Comparative Study of African Jihadists

Thu., Apr. 6, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Stig Jarle Hansen, Research Fellow, International Security Program

It is now over 16 years since the September 11th attack and the initiation of the so-called "war on terror," yet in Africa, none of the allies of Al Qaeda or the Islamic State have been defeated. This seminar bases itself on a comparative study of sub-Saharan jihadist organizations. The main argument is that the resilience of the organizations partly emerges because of lack of understanding of the relationship between the organizations and the territories in which they operate. Countering Violent Extremism and counter strategies have to be adjusted to the type of control these organizations wield in their area of operations.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Donald Trump speaks at the Polish National Alliance, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, in Chicago.

John Locher/AP

Seminar - Open to the Public

Presidential Control of Nuclear Weapons: Then and Now

Thu., Apr. 6, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

United States law vests the power to control the use of nuclear weapons exclusively in the person of the President or his legal successor. The degree to which this power has been located in a single individual has come into question several times in the history of nuclear weapons, including much more recently. In this talk, I will discuss the somewhat convoluted and unintuitive history of how this system was established during the Cold War, the moments at which it has been previously called into question, and discuss some of the policy questions that seem to face us on this matter in the post-Cold War.