3809 Items

Kurdish security forces south of Kirkuk

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Kurdish Region of Iraq is Going to Vote on Independence. Here's What You Need to Know.

| June 21, 2017

"The Kurdish referendum holds the possibility of affecting the balance of leverage between Irbil, Baghdad and regional powers, as well as shaking up internal Kurdish politics. With control over disputed territories and a referendum at hand, the Kurds are making a play for bargaining power on the road to independence. This does not represent a declaration of independence — but it is a strong indicator of where the focal point of Kurdish politics will lie in post-Islamic State Iraq."

Announcement - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

New Book by Former ISP Research Fellow Peter Krause on National Movements

| June 21, 2017

Former ISP (International Security Program) Research Fellow Peter Krause has published a book with Cornell University Press (2017), Rebel Power: Why National Movements Compete, Fight, and Win, as part of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs series.

Gen. Joseph Dunford prepares to testify on Capitol Hill

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

This Is How Great-Power Wars Get Started

| June 21, 2017

To avoid escalations of this sort, the Trump administration should now lay out a positively defined political vision for the Middle East, which would accompany and tether its negatively defined anti-Islamic State and anti-Iranian goals. At this time, the fundamental part of this vision must be a clear U.S. position on the future of Kurdish-held areas in Iraq and Syria.

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Sen. Sam Nunn: 'We Have a Choice Between Cooperation or Catastrophe'

| June 20, 2017

As a U.S. senator, Sam Nunn played a key role in conceiving the legislation—and then securing Congressional and government support—to fund the dismantling and safeguarding of nuclear weapons and materials in the possession of a disintegrating Soviet Union. This effort came to be known as the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction program, and June 17 marked 25 years since the signing of the first general framework agreement for CTR-funded projects by presidents George H.W. Bush and Boris Yeltsin. To learn more about this painstaking process, see our timeline of nuclear-security cooperation among the U.S., Russia and the other Newly Independent States.

Anti-THAAD protest

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

THAAD Illuminates Problems in South Korea's Civil-Military Relations

| June 16, 2017

"Civil-military relations, which refer to the relationship between the civilian political leadership and the military, have been widely studied due to the latent danger of a state's military usurping control from civilian authorities. As Socrates once said, soldiers protect the state from external threats, but they themselves are also potential threats to society. For this reason, limits must be placed on the military's role within a society, and civilian control of the military has been accepted as a norm within democratic regimes — political leaders set policy (ends), while the military use their military expertise to devise strategies (means) to implement that policy. This is essential for the democratic system, where civilian political leaders exercise the authority delegated to them by the people to rule. Thus, unelected soldiers must obey decisions made by political leaders. To this end, in most democracies civilians hold top national security posts."

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

25 Years of Nuclear Security Cooperation by the US, Russia and Other Newly Independent States: A Timeline

The timeline below was compiled by Simon Saradzhyan and Mariana Budjeryn and the foreword was written by William Tobey (author bios below). As an accompaniment, Ms. Budjeryn has also interviewed Sam Nunn, the former senator whose efforts were key to securing U.S. funding to help a disintegrating Soviet Union dismantle and safeguard its nuclear weapons. The timeline authors would like to thank former RM student associate Andre Gellerman for his research support and Susan Koch for her insightful comments. This is an evolving draft, produced in cooperation with the U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism at Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and with support from the center's Managing the Atom Project. A bibliography can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Analysis & Opinions - Foundation for Defense of Democracies

Drawing a “Broader Conclusion” on Iran’s Nuclear Program

| June 2017

Under the terms of the nuclear deal with Iran, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), key restrictions would expire if  the IAEA formally reaches a “broader conclusion” that Tehran’s nuclear program is entirely peaceful. Such a conclusion would result in the lifting of the UN’s remaining non-nuclear sanctions, including the ban on ballistic missile testing and the conventional arms embargo.  Furthermore, the U.S. and EU would delist additional entities from their sanctions lists.  Notably, the EU would delist all entities affiliated with Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, the organization responsible for both terrorist activities abroad as well as key aspects of the nuclear program.

 Rex Tillerson walks to speak at a news conference

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Why the United States Needs Qatar, and Why the Current Conflict is Best Settled Peacefully

| June 15, 2017

The most important action for the United States to take in the current situation is to ease tensions between Qatar and Saudi Arabia and continue to pressure both countries to improve their investigation of individuals supporting al-Qaeda and the Islamic State. Qatar's unorthodox diplomacy, their provision of a stable, strategically situated basing area, and their record in bringing to light human rights issues in the Middle East could actually be useful for United States.

A South Korean environmental activist wearing a gas mask participates in a protest to denounce the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate accord

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Trump Desperately Needs a Goodwill Ambassador

| June 14, 2017

"When one people holds another in high regard, it becomes easier for governments to cooperate and make sacrifices on behalf of each other. By contrast, if a country or its leaders are regarded with disdain, hatred, suspicion, or contempt, it will be harder for the governments to collaborate, and ambitious politicians may discover they can win support by turning their backs on the despised foreign power instead."

Jeremy Corbyn

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

That Time Theresa May Forgot that Elections Come With Opponents

| June 09, 2017

"The biggest hole in the Tory battle plan should have been obvious: Whether or not one thinks Brexit is a good idea, it is plainly not about stability, or continuity. It’s potentially the most radical change in U.K. domestic and foreign policy in half a century, a step that will change the daily lives of everyone in this country and that of their children."