71 Items

Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami supporter during a rally against drone attacks, June 4, 2011 in Karachi, Pakistan. Ilyas Kashmiri, a top al-Qaida commander and possible replacement for Osama bin Laden, was killed by a U.S. drone-fired missile.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Future of al-Qaeda

| June 6, 2011

"[W]hether al-Qaeda's ideology resonates with segments of the world's Muslim populations will have a critical bearing on the organization's ultimate fate. Recent political developments in Egypt, Tunisia and across the Middle East have exposed the bankruptcy of al-Qaeda's ideas as a means of challenging dictatorships in Muslim countries....Much will depend in the coming months and years on the extent to which the changes heralded by the "Arab Spring" improve the lot of common Arabs in terms of governance and economic prospects."

Shia youths from the Pakistani Kurram tribal area stage a mock scene during a rally demanding peace in their region, near the Presidential House, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Apr. 25, 2011.

AP Photo

Paper - Combating Terrorism Center

Shiism and Sectarian Conflict in Pakistan: Identity Politics, Iranian Influence, and Tit-for-Tat Violence

| September 2010

"Western analysts can no longer afford to ignore the growing potential for sectarian violence in Pakistan, for uncontrolled sectarian violence can destabilize Pakistan and the region at large. Internally, sectarian groups prefer to conduct their attacks in the Punjab, the center of gravity of the country's military and political elite. Attacks against Pakistan's Shia are also bound to have regional implications, since they can further stoke tensions between Pakistan and its neighbor Iran, a Shia-majority state."

U.S. Senator John Kerry, left, meets Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 16, 2011. Kerry wants Pakistan to free a U.S. consulate employee Raymond Davis, allegedly involved in shooting of 2 Pakistanis

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Asia Society

Davis Release Highlights Fragility of US-Pakistan Partnership

| March 16, 2011

There are several key points the US and Pakistan must learn from this episode: The bilateral relationship should not be allowed to become hostage to similar incidents in future; There should be complete transparency in the field of counter-terror operations and both sides should abide by agreed 'rules of the game'; Pakistan should be especially careful not to play politics in such cases, as only extremist elements benefit from such controversies; Finally, the US should also develop a better understanding of political realities on ground in Pakistan.

Pakistani police officers escort an armored car carrying Mumtaz Qadri, the alleged killer of Punjab governor Salman Taseer, to an Anti-Terrorist Court in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Jan. 6, 2011.

AP Photo

Report - United States Institute of Peace

Reforming Pakistan's Police and Law Enforcement Infrastructure: Is It Too Flawed to Fix?

| February 2011

An effective police force is critical to countering insurgency. In Pakistan, an understaffed and underequipped police force is increasingly called on to manage rising insecurity and militant violence. This report evaluates the obstacles to upgrading the existing police system and recommends traditional and innovative reform options, including major restructuring of the total civilian law enforcement infrastructure, without which the police force cannot be effectively improved.

A supporter of Pakistan People's Party mourns the death of Punjab's governor Salman Taseer who was shot dead by one of his guards, at a local hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Jan. 4, 2011.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Asia Society

A Bad Beginning for Pakistan in 2011

| January 5, 2011

"...[T]he killer was a member of the Elite Police—a unit with special training for counterterrorism operations. After the gruesome act, he handed himself over to police and proudly claimed that he did the right thing. This shows pathetic security arrangements and poor management. Some fanatics have already created a Facebook profile of the killer—an indication of divisions within society."

Nov. 17, 2009: Pakistani army troops patrol in a damaged market in Sararogha, in the Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan along the Afghan border.

AP Photo

Report - Century Foundation

Militancy in Pakistan's Borderlands: Implications for the Nation and for Afghan Policy

| 2010

This paper provides a critical perspective on past Pakistani policy toward jihadist militant groups, the growth of their influence in Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Kyber Pukhtunkhwa Province (KPP), and what steps need to be taken in order to reverse their momentum. Abbas argues that Pakistan's civilian and military leadership will have to transition from a short-term strategy of deal-making and army offensives to a long-term political solution that will erode the gains made by militant groups in these areas since 2002.

Smoke rises after a suicide bombing near the U.S. consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Apr. 5, 2010. The U.S. consulate was attacked with car bombs and grenades,  killing 3 people.

AP Photo

Paper - New America Foundation

Inside Pakistan's North-West Frontier Province: The Political Landscape of the Insurgency

| April 19, 2010

Despite comparatively progressive forces taking control of Pakistan's North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) after success in the February 2008 provincial elections, stability remains elusive and the law and order situation has gradually deteriorated, raising important questions about the correlation between politics in the province and the nature and extent of militancy there. This essay investigates how different political and religious forces have influenced the state of affairs in the province in recent years.

Border Security Force soldiers patrol the border with Pakistan in Gujarat, Nov. 25, 2009. Indian PM Manmohan Singh raised fears about Pakistani Taliban forces moving into the heart of Pakistan, which threatens both Pakistan's government and India.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Daily Star

Pakistan and India Should Consider Collaborating This Time

| December 4, 2009

"At every stage of the lengthy conflict that has brought the US into the region, Pakistan has sought to limit Indian influence in Afghanistan. Indeed, India's growing influence and investment in Afghanistan is disturbing to Pakistan's national security apparatus. Ultimately, the dynamics of Afghan politics will determine Afghanistan's fate. But a collaborative Indian-Pakistani effort to stabilize the country could work wonders."