72 Items

Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America's Power, by Meghan O'Sullivan. Published by Simon & Schuster on September 12, 2017.

Simon & Schuster

Book - Simon & Schuster

Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America's Power

| Sep. 12, 2017

Windfall is the boldest profile of the world’s energy resources since Daniel Yergin’s The Quest. Harvard professor and former Washington policymaker Meghan L. O’Sullivan reveals how fears of energy scarcity have given way to the reality of energy abundance. This abundance is transforming the geo-political order and boosting American power.

Mass protest against the privatization of PEMEX, Mexico City, March 18 2013.

Eneas De Troya

Analysis & Opinions - Dallas Morning News

Trump's Approach to Mexico Could Jeopardize America's Progress Toward Energy Independence

| Sep. 06, 2017

Unfortunately, the current administration's stance toward Mexico could jeopardize the progress that country is making to revive its oil sector, thereby making it harder for the continent to meet all its own energy needs.

This image made from undated video of a news bulletin aired by North Korea's KRT on Sept. 3, 2017, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un holds the Presidium of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee.

KRT via AP Video

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

Trump Can't Solve North Korea by Just Making a Deal

| Sep. 05, 2017

President Donald J. Trump’s tweet this weekend that the U.S. might terminate all trade with countries doing business with North Korea was widely derided on the grounds of realism. Given that 90 percent of North Korea’s trade is with China, the tweet was little more than a veiled threat to terminate all U.S. trade with Beijing, ending a bilateral trade relationship valued at $650 billion a year. It would, as many correctly pointed out, mean economic disaster for North Korea -- and also for the U.S.

Video - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Meghan O'Sullivan on Office Hours

| Sep. 01, 2017

Meghan O’Sullivan, Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and author of 'Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America’s Power,' talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about fracking, America’s strategic petroleum reserve, energy abundance, and her early start in geopolitics.

Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump meet at the 2017 G-20 Hamburg Summit, July 7, 2017.

www.kremlin.ru

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

The One Big Problem With New Russia Sanctions

| Aug. 10, 2017

The latest round of congressional sanctions against Russia garnered much attention for the message they sent to President Donald Trump: We don’t trust you to decide when to lift or ease sanctions on Moscow. True, it was an important signal to the American people, the president and the rest of the world that nearly all of America’s legislators felt Russia had to pay a price interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential elections.

But there were two other important messages embedded in the sanctions bill that are equally interesting and consequential.

Solar panels at sunrise.

Karsten Würth

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Geopolitics of Renewable Energy

| June 28, 2017

For a century, the geopolitics of energy has been synonymous with the
geopolitics of oil and gas. However, geopolitics and the global energy economy
are both changing. The international order predominant since the
end of World War II faces mounting challenges. At the same time, renewable
energy is growing rapidly. Nevertheless, the geopolitics of renewable
energy has received relatively little attention, especially when considering
the far-reaching consequences of a global shift to renewable energy.

The paper starts with a discussion of seven renewable energy scenarios
for the coming decades: the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2016, the EIA’s
International Energy Outlook 2016, IRENA’s REmap 2016, Bloomberg’s
New Energy Outlook 2016, BP’s Energy Outlook 2016, Exxon-Mobil’s Outlook
for Energy 2016 and the joint IEA and IRENA G20 de-carbonization
scenario.

An armed British soldier in Belfast, Northern Ireland during disorders in September 1969.

AP Photo/Royle

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

Theresa May's Troubles and 'The Troubles'

| June 21, 2017

On Monday, the newly elected Prime Minister of Ireland, Leo Varadkar, emerged from his meeting with his British counterpart, Theresa May, promising good news. Varadkar said he was satisfied May would not jeopardize the peace agreement in Northern Ireland in her efforts to secure the support of that province’s Democratic Unionist Party for her government.

Yet even if this is true, it is unrealistic to hope that a deal between the Tories and the DUP will have no impact on the politics of Northern Ireland. And if Varadkar is wrong, we could be headed toward a political stalemate or worse, and a possible economic crisis in that corner of the United Kingdom.

President Donald Trump and King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia talk together during ceremonies, Saturday, May 20, 2017, at the Royal Court Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Official White House Photo Shealah Craighead

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

In Saudi Shakeup, Economics Tops Counterterrorism

| June 21, 2017

The latest big news out of the Middle East is that Saudi Arabian King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud has ousted the crown prince and installed his 31-year-old son, Mohammed bin Salman, in that position. While the world waits to see more of the reaction from Saudis and others in the region, a few quick thoughts come to my mind.

President Donald Trump poses for photos with ceremonial swordsmen on his arrival to Murabba Palace, as the guest of King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia, Saturday evening, May 20, 2017, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Shealah Craighead/White House

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

Qatar Crisis Shows Risk of Trump's Saudi Reset

| June 09, 2017

President Donald Trump feels his recent trip to the Middle East was a great success, and the actions by Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies to isolate and punish Qatar this week were the first fruits of his new policy. In reality, the schism between Gulf Cooperation Council allies is a setback for U.S. interests, and the reset between Washington and Riyadh, heralded by the administration and many observers, if not a farce, is clearly far from complete.

The 2014 People's Climate Change March on August 21, 2014 at the Trump International Hotel and Tower at 1 Central Park West at West 61st Street in the Upper West Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City.

Wikimedia Commons / Beyond My Ken

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg View

How Trump Is Surrendering America's Soft Power

| June 02, 2017

President Donald Trump's decision to remove the U.S. from the Paris climate agreementis yet another manifestation -- alongside the budget submitted to Congress and the president's speech at NATO headquarters in Brussels -- of how he continues to see U.S. interests as narrowly economic, and U.S. influence as exerted solely through hard power.