1005 Events

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

U.S. Department of State

Seminar - Open to the Public

Revisiting Hiroshima in Iran: What Americans Really Think about Using Nuclear Weapons and Killing Noncombatants

Wed., Oct. 4, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Many scholars and political figures have cited the decline in American public opinion support for the dropping of the atomic bombs in 1945 as evidence that there is a widespread "nuclear taboo" or "noncombatant immunity norm." New survey experiments, however, demonstrate that a large majority of the U.S. public approves of the use of nuclear weapons today against Iran today in conditions that resemble the strategic situation the U.S. faced in 1945. These findings highlight the limited extent to which the U.S. public has accepted the principles of just war doctrine and suggest that the public is unlikely to be a serious constraint on any president contemplating the use of nuclear weapons in the crucible of war. 

Seminar - Open to the Public

"No Such Thing as a Little War": The Ideas Driving Great Power Military Intervention

Thu., Sep. 28, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Jacqueline L. Hazelton, Assistant Professor, Department of Strategy and Policy, U.S. Naval War College

What beliefs influence liberal great power policymakers to back a government threatened by an insurgency? Why do great powers continue seeking insurgent defeat when costs rise? This seminar identifies a core belief about national and international security in the literature on pacification from the post–World War II era to the current period of liberal interventionism. It analyzes how this belief distorts analyses of past interventions and shapes policymakers' intervention choices.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Oak Ridge National Lab

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Seminar - Open to the Public

Unclear Physics: Why Iraq and Libya failed to build nuclear weapons

Wed., Sep. 20, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Speaker: Målfrid Braut-Hegghammer, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Oslo

Many authoritarian leaders want nuclear weapons, but few manage to acquire them. Autocrats seeking nuclear weapons fail in different ways and to varying degrees—Iraq almost managed it; Libya did not come close. In this seminar, Målfrid Braut-Hegghammer compares the two failed nuclear weapons programs, arguing that state capacity played a crucial role in the trajectory and outcomes of both projects. 

Seminar - Open to the Public

The National Security Paradigm in Japan's Space Policy

Tue., Sep. 19, 2017 | 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Center for Government and International Studies - Knafel Building, Bowie-Vernon, Room K262

Speaker: Saadia Pekkanen, Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, Seattle.

Moderator: Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University.

In the past decade, Japan has emerged as one of the world's most prominent military space powers around. With the inescapable ambiguity of dual-use, Japan has acquired its impressive capabilities in full view of a pacifist public and under constitutional constraints. Today its national security space paradigm is openly and officially sanctioned by the country's legal and policy orientation. However, these realities are not well understood by Japan's allies or rivals, which limits our appreciation about what Japan can do in its national security interests both in the region and beyond.

Co-sponsored by the International Security Program

Seminar - Open to the Public

Can the U.S.-Japan Alliance Meet the Challenges of the Twenty-First Century?

Tue., Sep. 12, 2017 | 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Center for Government and International Studies - South Building, Belfer Case Study Room S020

Speakers: Daniel Russel, Diplomat in Residence and Senior Fellow, Asia Society Policy Institute; former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

Joseph Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, Emeritus, Harvard Kennedy School.

Moderator: Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University.

In this seminar, Ambassador Russel will examine how the U.S.-Japan alliance has evolved to address a varieties of global problems, drawing on his distinguished public service as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs (2013–2017) and Special Assistant to the President and National Security Council (NSC) Senior Director for Asian Affairs (2009–2013). Topics he will address will include both regional challenges in East Asia, such as North Korea's missile and nuclear capabilities as well as China's rise, and global challenges such as terrorism and climate change. Professor Joseph Nye will respond.

Co-sponsored by the International Security Program

"No chance to criticize." Uncle Sam sits at a table on which is a small cake on a platter labeled "Cuba," with a decanter labeled "Philippine Islands" on the table and a bottle labeled "Porto Rico" in an ice bucket. On the left, John Bull (Britain) and other colonial powers hold swords slicing a large cake on a platter labeled "China." John Bull (to the Powers): "What are you mad about? We can't grudge him a light lunch while we are feasting!"

Library of Congress

Seminar - Open to the Public

Cancelled: "'Influence' Disappears; Territory Remains": Living and Dying Nations in 1898

Thu., May 18, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Ben Rhode, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

This seminar is cancelled.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Human Resources of Non-State Armed Groups

Thu., May 4, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Vera Mironova, Research Fellow, International Security Program

The speaker will discuss the labor market of non-state armed groups on the ground and at the leadership level, focusing on recruitment, retention, and turnover. 

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the BRICS summit, July 8, 2015

Creative Commons kremlin.ru

Seminar - Open to the Public

Chinese and Russian Approaches to International Law vs. U.S. Visions of Global Order

Thu., Apr. 27, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

This seminar will present a comparative assessment of Chinese and Russian approaches to the international legal and security architecture stood up by the United States after World War II, beginning with a historical overview of the emergence of the concept of "international law."

Seminar - Open to the Public

India and the NSG

Wed., Apr. 26, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Ji Yeon-jung, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

This seminar will examine India’s strategy, agenda setting, and coalition-building to gain membership to the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) as well as India’s broad efforts to build a reputation as a major stakeholder in the nuclear nonproliferation regime as a de facto nuclear weapons state. For the last two decades, India has been steadily working to gain international acceptance of its de facto nuclear status. Following the Indo-US nuclear deal in 2008, India concluded eleven civil nuclear agreements creating an unofficial forum for India’s bid for membership in the NSG. Although India’s setback to its NSG bid at the Vienna meeting in November 2016 highlighted the challenges that India must continue to address, Ji Yeon-jung will argue that the number of achievements and engagements that New Delhi addressed in the past few years explicitly demonstrates India’s transitional status in the changing global nuclear order.