6 Events

"No chance to criticize." Uncle Sam sits at a table on which is a small cake on a platter labeled "Cuba," with a decanter labeled "Philippine Islands" on the table and a bottle labeled "Porto Rico" in an ice bucket. On the left, John Bull (Britain) and other colonial powers hold swords slicing a large cake on a platter labeled "China." John Bull (to the Powers): "What are you mad about? We can't grudge him a light lunch while we are feasting!"

Library of Congress

Seminar - Open to the Public

Cancelled: "'Influence' Disappears; Territory Remains": Living and Dying Nations in 1898

Thu., May 18, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Ben Rhode, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

This seminar is cancelled.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The History of Cyber and Intelligence Operations

Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 | 5:15pm - 6:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Nye A, 5th Floor

Please join us for a panel discussion with Command Historian Dr. Michael Warner and Historian of GCHQ Professor Richard Aldrich, moderated by the International Security Program's Dr. Calder Walton and the Cyber Security Project's Director Dr. Michael Sulmeyer. This event is open to the public, but seating and admittance will be offered on a first come, first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Tinker, Tailor, Ally, Spy: The Origins and Evolution of Anglo-American Intelligence Relations

Thu., Feb. 2, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Speaker: Calder Walton, Ernest May Fellow in History and Policy, International Security Program

Stretching from the Second World War to the early Cold War, this seminar will examine the origins, evolution, stresses, and strains of British and U.S. intelligence relations—the closest intelligence relationship between two powers in history. Using a series of case studies, from signals intelligence-sharing agreements to atomic espionage and covert action during Britain's end of empire, it will explore the impact that British and U.S. intelligence had on post-war international relations. While collaborating together in unprecedented ways, it will be shown that, in some instances in the post-war years, British and U.S. intelligence worked at cross-purposes—and were also disastrously penetrated by their opponents, Soviet intelligence. This seminar will also offer some (arguably much-needed) policy-relevant historical lessons for governments and intelligence communities today.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.