17 Items

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Graham Allison on Office Hours

| June 30, 2017

Graham Allison (@GrahamTAllison), who is stepping down as the Director of the Belfer Center, a position he’s held for the past 22 years, takes a moment to talk with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about his new book “Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap.” Allison explains the big idea that is Thucydides’s Trap, what might spark war between America and China, and what he has in common with Queen Elizabeth II.

Jeremy Corbyn

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

That Time Theresa May Forgot that Elections Come With Opponents

| June 09, 2017

"The biggest hole in the Tory battle plan should have been obvious: Whether or not one thinks Brexit is a good idea, it is plainly not about stability, or continuity. It’s potentially the most radical change in U.K. domestic and foreign policy in half a century, a step that will change the daily lives of everyone in this country and that of their children."

White House

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Prospect

“Lies, Plain and Simple”: How James Comey Became Trump’s Meddlesome Priest

| June 09, 2017

"The issues at stake in this reality TV series of presidential politics can be easily ridiculed—will Trump tweet?—but they are profound. Comey's Congressional testimony goes to the heart of the proper functioning of US democracy, being concerned with checks and balances on the executive branch, and, crucially, whether President Trump obstructed justice by exerting pressure on America's senior law enforcement officer."

Boris Johnson greets Rex Tillerson, outside Carlton Gardens in London

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Prospect

The Manchester Attack Revealed Crucial Differences in How the British and American Press Operate

| May 30, 2017

"The disparity between British and US media reporting of the Manchester attack highlights a problem only likely to increase in the future: how to regulate reporting on national security issues in a free society, with a free press, in the digital age. With the world’s increasing interconnectivity, in which we can receive news from outlets all over the world to our phones, and even watches, previous arrangements to regulate British press reporting seem increasingly anachronistic."

Rep. Adam Schiff stands next to a photograph of President Donald Trump and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Politico

That Time the Soviets Bugged Congress, and Other Spy Tales

| May 22, 2017

"It is arguably one matter to spy on colonial delegations, but quite another to bug the president of the United States. Could the Russians have done it? The Trump administration's confusion about whether the TASS reporter in the Oval Office was photographing for private use, as the White House thought but apparently did not check, or acting officially for publication, as the Russian Foreign Ministry claimed, does not inspire confidence."

President Donald Trump listens as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Prospect

America's Leaker-in-chief: Trump and Russia

| May 19, 2017

"To make matters worse, this intelligence was derived from a US ally, reportedly Israel. Never before has a US president unilaterally disclosed to a hostile power, Russia, ultra secret intelligence derived from a US intelligence ally without permission from that country. If the reports are true, we are now in historically uncharted territory. Trump's disclosures to the Kremlin—pundits are calling it LeakGate—pose a serious risk to US national security. America and its intelligence allies are not equipped for a leaker-in-chief as president. No wonder Lavrov and Kislak are smiling in the pictures of their Oval Office meeting."

Analysis & Opinions - The Huffington Post

Trump Risks Making Stalin's Disastrous Mistake On Intelligence Analysis

| May 04, 2017

"A leader who accesses raw intelligence risks short-circuiting this entire enterprise, bypassing agencies that are supposed to prevent partial assessments. An inevitable risk is that a decision-maker with access to raw data that has not been professionally assessed will look for information that confirms his or her preexisting beliefs. Far from intelligence agencies telling leaders what they do not want to hear, in these circumstances, intelligence risks becoming self-fulfilling sycophancy."

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Harvard President Faust Links History and Leadership

| Spring 2017

For nearly ten years, Harvard's President Drew Gilpin Faust has led the university with a historian's perspective. On June 30, she joined the Belfer Center's Applied History Project Faculty Working Group and shared her views on applying history to current situations.

President Donald Trump walks up the stairs of Air Force One

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Prospect

Spies, Lies and Wiretaps

| Mar. 27, 2017

"Taken together, these points raise three fundamental issues about the Trump White House wiretapping claims: first, a US president is unable to order a wiretap, or otherwise intercept, US communications, as Trump’s tweets suggest. This can only be done through a US court. Second, for GCHQ to intercept communications of a US presidential candidate would require authorisation from a British foreign secretary and it is unthinkable that a foreign secretary would sign a warrant authorising such an intrusion into domestic US politics. Third, even if this did happen, Britain and America’s signals intelligence sharing agreements expressly prevent either country doing something that would be illegal under the laws of the other country. In other words, the conspiracy theory of GCHQ wiretapping Trump is necessarily based on the premise that it is illegal. If this is what the White House is alleging, then it should make this clear."