Articles

1899 Items

John P. Holdren

NASA

Magazine Article - Science

Former Obama Science Adviser John Holdren on the White House Science Office and Trump's Science Policy

    Author:
  • Jeffrey Mervis
| July 12, 2017

soldiers goose-step across Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea

AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File

Journal Article - Foreign Policy

‘No Good Options’ on North Korea Is a Myth

| July 07, 2017

It is now a commonplace to argue that there are no good options on North Korea — common perhaps, but wrong. In fact, it is Pyongyang that faces militarily and economically dominant adversaries, and dim prospects for long-term success. To be sure, the threat posed by North Korea’s growing nuclear and ballistic missile arsenals is changing in kind as well as magnitude and will require responses, but some perspective is warranted. Japan, South Korea, and the United States are more than capable of meeting that threat and deterring a catastrophic attack from the North.

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Journal Article - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

The future of US–Russian nuclear deterrence and arms control

| June 19, 2017

During the latter part of the Cold War, many strategists thought of nuclear deterrence and arms control as two of the most essential stabilizing elements of the same strategy in managing an adversarial relationship. The renewed crisis between the West (the United States and NATO member states) and Russia demonstrates how critical these elements are to the strategic nuclear relationship. As a result of recent setbacks between Washington and Moscow in the past few years, arms control has taken a back seat, and the risk of conflict due to miscalculation is the highest it has been since the 1980s.

Shanghai

Creative Commons

Journal Article - Environmental Research Letters

Air Quality and Climate Benefits of Long-distance Electricity Transmission in China

    Authors:
  • Jiahai Yuan
  • Yu Zhao
  • Meiyun Lin
  • Qiang Zhang
  • David G. Victor
  • Denise L. Mauzerall
| 2017

China is the world's top carbon emitter and suffers from severe air pollution. It has recently made commitments to improve air quality and to peak its CO2 emissions by 2030. The authors examine one strategy that can potentially address both issues—utilizing long-distance electricity transmission to bring renewable power to the polluted eastern provinces. 

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during an interview in Paris, France, Monday, May 29, 2017. In the interview with French newspaper Le Figaro released Tuesday, Putin reaffirmed his strong denial of Russia's involvement in the hacking of Democratic National Committee emails that yielded disclosures that proved embarrassing for Hillary Clinton's campaign. (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Newspaper Article - The New York Times

Trump-Comey Feud Eclipses a Warning on Russia: ‘They Will Be Back’

| June 10, 2017

What started out as a counterintelligence investigation to guard the United States against a hostile foreign power has morphed into a political scandal about what Mr. Trump did, what he said and what he meant by it. 

Wind turbines in a rapeseed field in Sandesneben, Germany

Flickr/Jürgen Guerito

Journal Article - Nature

The G20 must govern the shift to low-carbon energy

| June 07, 2017

The world's energy system needs rebuilding. The Paris agreement to keep global warming “well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels” demands that we replace fossil fuels with solar, wind, geothermal and biomass energy. The price tag is vast: investing US$120 trillion in energy projects between 2016 and 2050, at twice the current annual rate of $1.8 trillion a year, will deliver a 66% chance of achieving the Paris target. We must halve oil production and stop using coal to produce electricity.

Newspaper Article - The New York Times

Some U.S. Diplomats Stage Quiet Revolt Amid Tensions With Trump

| June 06, 2017

Professor Nicholas Burns, quoted in a New York Times article titled “Some U.S. Diplomats Stage Quiet Revolt Amid Tensions With Trump,” describes the uncomfortable position that top US diplomats find themselves in as tensions between the State Department and the White House run high