Middle East & North Africa

3568 Items

teaser image

Report - Washington Institute for Near East Policy

How Al-Qaeda Survived Drones, Uprisings, and the Islamic State: The Nature of the Current Threat

    Editor:
  • Aaron Y. Zelin
| June 2017

In this new Policy Focus, Washington Institute fellow Aaron Y. Zelin compiles case studies demonstrating how each part of al-Qaeda's network has evolved and survived the various challenges it has faced roughly since the Obama administration took office. Written by eminent scholars, practitioners, and government officials from the United States and abroad, the chapters are informed by a recent workshop in which the participants gave candid, off-the-record assessments of numerous key issues, including al-Qaeda's current strategic outlook, a close examination of its branch in Syria, its branches outside of Syria (AQAP, AQIM, al-Shabab, and AQIS), and its current financial situation.

In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014 file photo, Jordanian children chant anti-Israel slogans during a Muslim Brotherhood Islamic movement protest in front of the Israeli embassy in Amman, Jordan. A diplomatic standoff between Qatar and a quartet of Arab nations accusing it of sponsoring terrorism has thrust a spotlight on an opaque network of charities and prominent figures freely operating in Qatar. (AP Photo, File)

AP Photo, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Telegraph

The Saudi Coalition Is Right. Qatar's Support for the Muslim Brotherhood Must Not Stand

| July 19, 2017

The Saudi coalition knows what the experiences of numerous Muslim governments have long proven: the Muslim Brotherhood is an oppositionist movement that does not represent a sustainable form of governance, offers little in the way of  social or economic programmes, and some of its members have been linked to political violence and jihadist terror.

Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement negotiations

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Global Consequences of Trump's Incompetence

| July 18, 2017

"Instead of relying on U.S. guidance and (generally) supporting U.S. policy initiatives, states that lose confidence in America's competence will begin to hedge and make their own arrangements. They’ll do deals with each other and sometimes with countries that the United States regards as adversaries."

Isis fighters in Mosul

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The Names of Jihad

| July 14, 2017

"Although noms de guerre have been a common practice in combat for centuries, fighters in Syria and Iraq have turned them into an art, stringing together elements that identify a great deal, real and imagined, about the fighter. Unlike the short pseudonyms of other conflicts, Syrian pseudonyms are long, with elements that vary between the groups."

F-35 fighter jet in Israel

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Newsweek

How Long Could Israel Survive Without America?

| July 14, 2017

"From the vantage point of contemporary readers, it may be surprising to learn that the US–Israeli relationship was actually quite limited and even cool until the late 1960s. It then evolved into a more classic patron-client relationship in the 1970s, and only in the 1980s started to become the institutionalised, strategic relationship that we know today."

Media Office of Iraqi Prime Minister

Media Office of Iraqi Prime Minister

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

How to Make the Islamic State’s Defeat Last

| July 12, 2017

"The liberation of Mosul and the inevitable, approaching liberation of Raqqa in Syria will not be the end of the Islamic State and its evil ideology. But they crush the group’s pretense to having an actual “state” based upon it. As its surviving leaders scurry to the corners of the desert, no longer can they claim to head a winning movement. Their defeat diminishes the inspiration for violent extremists, or simply lost souls on social media, to attack Americans and our friends. This is a necessary step forward in combating terrorism. Americans are safer for it."

teaser image

Analysis & Opinions - NPR

Nicholas Burns on the Aftermath of G20 - Wisconsin Public Radio

| July 11, 2017

President Donald Trump's time at the G20 Summit in Germany last week gained attention for his meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping. But it also included negotiations on a Syrian cease fire, millions of dollars toward a women's empowerment fund and disagreements on trade and climate. Where does this year's summit of world leaders leave the U.S.?

Vladimir Putin: From KGB to President of Russia

WashingtonPost.com

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Months of Russia controversy leaves Trump ‘boxed in’ ahead of Putin meeting

| July 04, 2017

President Trump promised voters that he would strike “a great deal” with Russia and its autocratic president, Vladimir Putin. Now nearly six months into his presidency, Trump is set to finally meet Putin at a summit this week in Hamburg — severely constrained and facing few good options that would leave him politically unscathed.

Solar panels at sunrise.

Karsten Würth

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Geopolitics of Renewable Energy

| June 28, 2017

For a century, the geopolitics of energy has been synonymous with the
geopolitics of oil and gas. However, geopolitics and the global energy economy
are both changing. The international order predominant since the
end of World War II faces mounting challenges. At the same time, renewable
energy is growing rapidly. Nevertheless, the geopolitics of renewable
energy has received relatively little attention, especially when considering
the far-reaching consequences of a global shift to renewable energy.

The paper starts with a discussion of seven renewable energy scenarios
for the coming decades: the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2016, the EIA’s
International Energy Outlook 2016, IRENA’s REmap 2016, Bloomberg’s
New Energy Outlook 2016, BP’s Energy Outlook 2016, Exxon-Mobil’s Outlook
for Energy 2016 and the joint IEA and IRENA G20 de-carbonization
scenario.