Analysis & Opinions

5525 Items

Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at a Likud Party conference

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Why Israelis Should Hope the Palestinian National Movement Is Not Dead Yet

| Sep. 20, 2017

"The fate of the Jewish national movement is inextricably linked to that of the Palestinian national movement, and there is no way to get around this. Indeed, the ostensible 'victory' will leave us with a binational state and endanger the future of the entire Zionist enterprise. It is rare that history allows us to see a preview of coming events, but a binational reality has long gone from a potential future nightmare, to a bitter present. A present which is played out daily on our TV screens, with the terrorism which has become a self-evident part of our lives, the defense establishment's repeated fears of renewed waves of violence, this time during the upcoming holidays, the demographic trends underway, and the brutalization of public discourse."

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Analysis & Opinions - Politico

The Electoral College Is a National Security Threat

    Author:
  • Matt Olsen
| Sep. 20, 2017

The Electoral College system provides ripe microtargeting grounds for foreign actors who intend to sabotage presidential elections via information and disinformation campaigns, as well as by hacking our voting infrastructure. One reason is that citizens in certain states simply have more voting power than citizens in other states, such as Texas and California. This makes it easier for malign outside forces to direct their efforts.

Nicholas Burns on Greater Boston

WGBH.com

Analysis & Opinions - WGBH

Ambassador Burns on Trump’s UN Debut - WGBH "Greater Boston"

| Sep. 20, 2017

It was the debut speech heard around the world – Donald Trump at the United Nations, putting American First and other nations on notice. Over the course of 41 minutes, the president criticized the Iran nuclear deal, promised to “totally destroy” North Korea if its leader Kim Jong-Un – otherwise known as “Rocketman” – continues his path and vowed to crush the “loser terrorists” in the Middle East.

 

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Nicholas Boos / Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Why Foreign Propaganda Is More Dangerous Now

| Sep. 19, 2017

The debate in the United States about foreign interference concentrates on who did what to influence last year’s election and the need for democracies to strengthen their cybersecurity for emails, critical infrastructure and voting platforms. But we need to pay far more attention to another vulnerability: our adversaries’ attempts to subvert our democratic processes by aiming falsehoods at ripe subsets of our population — and not only during elections.

Emergency workers help people disembark a train near the Parsons Green Underground Station after an explosion in London on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. (Pool via AP)

Pool via AP

Analysis & Opinions - London Times

Internet Giants Must Do Far More to Tackle Extremism

| Sep. 19, 2017

The terrorist attack on the London Underground involving an explosive device that can be built from instructions available online underlined once again the scale of the challenges we face from Islamist extremists. Attention has already focused on the possible role of the internet in radicalising the perpetrator(s). Unfortunately, extremist activity in cyberspace has become an increasing issue in recent years.

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Analysis & Opinions - Public Radio International

To The Point/KCRW: Trump Threatens to 'Totally Destroy' North Korea

| Sep. 19, 2017

As other world leaders took their turns today, President Trump made his first address to the UN General Assembly. He threatened what he called, "small regimes than violate UN principles. Trump threatened to "totally destroy" North Korea, calling Kim Jung Un "Rocket Man" on a "suicide mission." He told an audience of world leaders that Iran is a "murderous regime," and that the nuclear deal is "an embarrassment" to the United States. While saying that some countries around the world are "going to hell," he also called for "standing together" — with the US and every other nation putting its own interests first. All this with cutbacks curtailing State Department diplomacy. Is the Trump Administration giving up leadership of the Western World?

The Belfer Center's Nick Burns and John Park discuss on KCRW's To The Point. 

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Most Surprising Thing About Trump’s U.N. Speech

| Sep. 19, 2017

When you discount the rhetorical overkill, the most surprising thing about President Trump’s address to the United Nations on Tuesday was how conventional it was. He supported human rights and democracy; he opposed rogue regimes; he espoused a global community of strong, sovereign nations. Pretty shocking stuff.

A Muslim woman wears a mask of  Aung San Suu Kyi

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The World Knew Ahead of Time the Rohingya Were Facing Genocide

| Sep. 19, 2017

"The plight of the Rohingya suggests that early warnings do little to prevent atrocities against vulnerable groups. The high risk of mass atrocities was clear from the escalating communitarian violence, the documented uptick in online hate speech beginning in 2012, and the tightening of official restrictions on the Rohingya’s movement and activities."

Senators from both parties listen as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

The Bipartisan President

| Sep. 18, 2017

It seems like the craziest idea in modern American political history. A Republican president, whose party controls both houses of Congress and who enjoys enduring popularity among Republican voters, is playing footsie with the Democrats. The ghastly possibility is dawning on Trump’s most ardent supporters on the right that he might be contemplating outright defection, to become the first bipartisan president in American history.