Asia & the Pacific

2681 Items

Pixabay

Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

Watch Out for the Blowback of Secondary Sanctions on North Korea

| Apr. 28, 2017

While tensions continue to flare along the Korean peninsula, the Trump administration struggles to articulate its strategy to persuade North Korea to halt its nuclear program. In a recent visit to the de-militarized zone, Vice President Pence warned Pyongyang to not test America’s “strength and resolve,” citing recent U.S. military strikes in Syria and Afghanistan as a forewarning. A not-so-veiled threat that the Trump administration considers “all options” to be on the table. What is unknown, however, is whether this increased rhetoric is merely saber-rattling or is the opening salvo for a true shift from Obama’s doctrine of “strategic patience.” That is, continuing to apply political and economic pressure until Pyongyang returns to the negotiating table.

Donald Trump and Xi Jinping at Mar-a-Lago, Florida

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Worst Mistake of Trump's First 100 Days

| Apr. 26, 2017

"...[B]ut in the long run Trump's biggest mistake has been his clueless approach to Asia. Europe is important, but its current problems are mostly internal and the United States cannot do much to address them. The Middle East is a mess, of course, but the United States does not need to fix it, does not know how to fix it, and shouldn't waste time, money, or soldiers' lives trying to fix it. Trump may find himself dragged back into the Middle East cauldron — especially if he tries to get tough with Iran — but his missteps there have done little damage so far (fingers crossed)."

Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017.

Wong Maye-E/AP

Analysis & Opinions - Defense One

Scuttle the Iran Nuke Deal? That Approach Didn’t Stop North Korea

| Apr. 26, 2017

“The Trump administration is currently conducting across the entire government a review of our Iran policy,” U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced on April 19, adding that “an unchecked Iran has the potential to follow the same path as North Korea and take the world along with it.” Ironically, the Trump administration appears to be following the same path on Iran as George W. Bush did on North Korea. The result could be equally dangerous.

By undermining implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA — a viable, verified, and sound agreement that blocks Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons — President Trump risks removing the shackles from Tehran’s nuclear efforts. We’ve been down that road before; instead of preserving and strengthening the Agreed Framework with North Korea, Bush freed Pyongyang to keep working on nuclear weapons that could eventually reach American territory.

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

AP/Wong Maye-E

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

    Authors:
  • Keir A. Lieber
  • Daryl Press
| Spring 2017

For decades, nuclear deterrence has depended on the impossibility of a first strike destroying a country’s nuclear arsenal. Technological advances, however, are undermining states’ abilities to hide and protect their nuclear arsenals. These developments help explain why nuclear-armed states have continued to engage in security competition: nuclear deterrence is neither automatic nor permanent. Thus, the United States should enhance its counterforce capabilities and avoid reducing its nuclear arsenal.

Donald Trump and Jared Kushner in Oval Office

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump Has Learned a Lot. But He's Neglecting a Huge Part of American Leadership.

| Apr. 25, 2017

"The system the United States created has been called a liberal international order, because openness produces public goods available to all. But the label is confusing because it covers political-military affairs, economic relations, ecological relations and even promotion of liberal values. It remains to be seen to what degree these different aspects depend on each other and what the result will be if Trump unpacks the post-1945 package."

Calder Walton is a postdoctoral Ernest May Fellow in History and Policy at the Belfer Center's International Security Program. (Bennett Craig)

Bennett Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Calder Walton: History Is More Interesting Than “007”

    Author:
  • Josh Coe
| Spring 2017

An expert in intelligence history and implications for intelligence communities and policymakers today, Walton has written several articles that connect his research with recent headlines on Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. 

An overflow crowd listens to a panel discussion on the background and impact of Russian cyber attacks. (Bennett Craig)

(Bennett Craig)

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Russian Cyber Operations 2017

Spring 2017

Cyber Security Project Director Dr. Michael Sulmeyer led a discussion on the future of Russian Cyber Operations with New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger, Director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution Dr. Fiona Hill, and Cyber Security Project Fellow Dr. Ben Buchanan.