Asia & the Pacific

2647 Items

From right, Cathay Pacific Chief Operating Officer Rupert Hogg, Chairman John Slosar, Chief Executive Ivan Chu and Finance Director Martin Murray attend a news conference as they announce the company result in Hong Kong, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific Airways has posted its first annual loss in almost a decade, blaming it on tough competition from rival airlines, slowing Chinese economic growth and a stronger currency. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

Analysis & Opinions - South China Morning Post

Why Hong Kong and Singapore must help their airlines soar

| Mar. 21, 2017

Derwin Pereira says no laissez-faire principles can be prized more than the symbolic importance of Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines to each territory. Both are premium Asian airlines. Both are under pressure from upstarts in other parts of Asia and even in their own regional backyards. And both need their governments to accord them the courtesy given to national institutions.

TV screens show file images of South Korean President Park Geun-hye in Seoul

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

South Koreans Checked the Retreat of Democracy. Now It's Time for the Americans.

| Mar. 17, 2017

"Four years of the Park presidency has inflicted serious damage on South Korean society.  The media has lost its capacity to check government power. The intelligence community has been degraded as a political tool for Ms. Park.  The artistic and intellectual communities have self-censored their words and deeds in fear of retaliation. Corruption abounds. If unchecked, the Trump presidency could cause comparable harm to American society. Thankfully, the United States retains a functioning media, intelligence agencies, courts, etc. that can provide checks and balances against the government."

In this Feb. 5, 2016 file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks from the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File

Analysis & Opinions - Jewish World Review

Cyber War I has already begun

| Mar. 15, 2017

There is good reason to fear it could be the Second Korean War, with craziness in North Korea and chaos in the South. Or it could be yet another quagmire in the Middle East. Trump's most excitable critics keep warning that World War III will happen on his watch. But I am more worried about Cyber War I - especially as it has already begun.

A currency trader calculates Malaysian ringgit notes at a currency exchange store in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

(AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Addicted to Dollars

| Mar. 02, 2017

Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.

Institute of Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing's Haidian District

DigitalGlobe

Discussion Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A Case Study of a World-Class Research Project Accomplished in China: Lessons for China's Science Policy

| February 2017

It has long been a great Chinese ambition to have a high impact toplevel scientific research conducted in domestic China. In this paper, we provide a case study of the recent discovery of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect by the group led by Prof. Qikun Xue at Tsinghua University. We analyze the entire experimental discovery process, explore the research culture developed in this condensed matter and materials physics research group, examine China's funding environment and investigate the functioning of this multi-group collaboration. Lessons from this case study will shed lights on how to foster high impact world-class research institutions in China.

President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs

How Trump Can Strengthen the U.S.-Japan Alliance

| Feb. 17, 2017

Last week’s meeting between President Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe went surprisingly well, but if this summit is the baseline test of Mr. Trump’s capacity to handle foreign policy and national security challenges, then the bar may be set too low, because rising tensions in East Asia will almost surely test the administration in the future.