Europe

1440 Items

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, with their wives, first lady Melania Trump and Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan are seated during a dinner at Mar-a-Lago, Thursday, April 6, 2017, in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner are seated at left. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The most important economic challenge that China poses

| Apr. 09, 2017

Focusing on China’s trade deficit with the United States is largely misguided. Yes, China subsidizes various exports to the rest of the world in a number of ways. But if the United States succeeds in stopping the subsidies or blocking the subsidized products, the result will be that companies will shift production to Vietnam and other low-wage countries—not create good jobs in the United States.

Ambassador Douglas E. Lute

U.S. Department of Defense/Senior Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz

Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ambassador Douglas E. Lute Named Senior Fellow by Belfer Center's Future of Diplomacy Project

The Future of Diplomacy Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs has named Ambassador Douglas E. Lute a Senior Fellow. While at the Kennedy School, Ambassador Lute will initiate a research project focused on NATO and transatlantic relations that will address the multiplicity of challenges facing the alliance as it approaches its 70th anniversary. He will also share his expertise in security and diplomacy by conducting seminars and study groups with students and fellows.

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

Conversations in Diplomacy: Jake Sullivan on Deconstructing Trump Foreign Policy

| Apr. 03, 2017

Jake Sullivan, Future of Diplomacy Project Senior Fellow, in conversation with Faculty Director Nicholas Burns, attempts to deconstruct the logic behind President Trump's foreign policy decisions.

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

Conversations in Diplomacy: Douglas Alexander on Triggering Article 50

| Mar. 30, 2017

Faculty Director Nicholas Burns speaks with Douglas Alexander about the future of the UK just days after Prime Minister Theresa May triggered Article 50, initiating the separation between Europe and the United Kingdom Alexander previews the road ahead, identifying the underlying contradictions that that led to Brexit and how they might manifest themselves in other parts of the world.

Brexit

DOTTEDYETI/FOTOLIA

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

The EU-UK divorce begins

| Mar. 28, 2017

Forty-four years after the United Kingdom entered into an often tempestuous but not always loveless union with Europe, Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger formal divorce proceedings Wednesday.

At the heart of the British position in these complex negotiations is a simple trade-off between sovereignty and prosperity.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, foreground right, attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

(Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

America Is Ill-Prepared to Counter Russia’s Information Warfare

| Mar. 27, 2017

Propaganda is perhaps the second- or third-oldest profession. Using information as a tool to affect outcomes is as old as politics. What’s new today is the reach of social media, the anonymity of the internet, and the speed with which falsehoods and fabrications can propagate.

Nicholas Burns (r) and Seth Moulton

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

Conversations in Diplomacy: Congressman Seth Moulton

| Mar. 27, 2017

In this installation of Conversations in Diplomacy, Congressman Seth Moulton, Representative of the Sixth District of Massachusetts, military veteran, and graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School, discusses the most serious threats to U.S. national security with Ambassador Nicholas Burns, Faculty Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project.

President Donald Trump walks up the stairs of Air Force One

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Prospect

Spies, Lies and Wiretaps

| Mar. 27, 2017

"Taken together, these points raise three fundamental issues about the Trump White House wiretapping claims: first, a US president is unable to order a wiretap, or otherwise intercept, US communications, as Trump’s tweets suggest. This can only be done through a US court. Second, for GCHQ to intercept communications of a US presidential candidate would require authorisation from a British foreign secretary and it is unthinkable that a foreign secretary would sign a warrant authorising such an intrusion into domestic US politics. Third, even if this did happen, Britain and America’s signals intelligence sharing agreements expressly prevent either country doing something that would be illegal under the laws of the other country. In other words, the conspiracy theory of GCHQ wiretapping Trump is necessarily based on the premise that it is illegal. If this is what the White House is alleging, then it should make this clear."