North America

4539 Items

Juliette Kayyem with Dean Douglas Elmendorf before a JFK Jr. Forum on President Trump’s executive orders on immigration. (Benn Craig)

Benn Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Homeland Security Project Focuses on Immigration and Borders, Threats and Resiliency

Under the leadership of the Belfer Center's Juliette Kayyem, the Homeland Security Project will focus on the challenges in protecting the U.S.

teaser image

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Q&A: Immigration and Terrorism

| Spring 2017

In response to the Trump administration’s rollout of aggressive policies on immigration and travel, Farah Pandith and Ayaan Hirsi Ali­—both senior fellows with the Belfer Center’s Future of Diplomacy Project—have shared their contrasting views in media interviews.

Calder Walton is a postdoctoral Ernest May Fellow in History and Policy at the Belfer Center's International Security Program. (Bennett Craig)

Bennett Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Calder Walton: History Is More Interesting Than “007”

    Author:
  • Josh Coe
| Spring 2017

An expert in intelligence history and implications for intelligence communities and policymakers today, Walton has written several articles that connect his research with recent headlines on Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. 

Photo of Kate Cronin-Furman speaking about her research on human rights and mass atrocities. (Bennett Craig)

Bennett Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Kate Cronin-Furman: Holding Mass Atrocity Offenders Accountable

    Author:
  • Bret Hauff
| Spring 2017

Cronin-Furman said she came to the Belfer Center to be a part of a community that instigates change, one she feels is at the forefront of academic work in international relations and national security.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Looking at Insurgent Groups and How They Use International Diplomacy to Gain Support

| Spring 2017

Morgan Kaplan, a research fellow with the Belfer Center’s International Security Program, researches the international politics of rebellion with a focus on how insurgent groups use international diplomacy to solicit third-party support.

An overflow crowd listens to a panel discussion on the background and impact of Russian cyber attacks. (Bennett Craig)

(Bennett Craig)

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Russian Cyber Operations 2017

Spring 2017

Cyber Security Project Director Dr. Michael Sulmeyer led a discussion on the future of Russian Cyber Operations with New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger, Director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution Dr. Fiona Hill, and Cyber Security Project Fellow Dr. Ben Buchanan.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Harvard President Faust Links History and Leadership

| Spring 2017

For nearly ten years, Harvard's President Drew Gilpin Faust has led the university with a historian's perspective. On June 30, she joined the Belfer Center's Applied History Project Faculty Working Group and shared her views on applying history to current situations.

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

AP/Wong Maye-E

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

    Authors:
  • Keir A. Lieber
  • Daryl Press
| Spring 2017

For decades, nuclear deterrence has depended on the impossibility of a first strike destroying a country’s nuclear arsenal. Technological advances, however, are undermining states’ abilities to hide and protect their nuclear arsenals. These developments help explain why nuclear-armed states have continued to engage in security competition: nuclear deterrence is neither automatic nor permanent. Thus, the United States should enhance its counterforce capabilities and avoid reducing its nuclear arsenal.