Conflict & Conflict Resolution

2332 Items

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- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

International Security

| Summer 2017

A sampling of articles in the Spring 2016 issue of the Belfer Center's journal International Security.

International Security is America’s leading journal of security affairs. 
IS was ranked first in impact factor for 2014 among 85 journals of international relations in the annual “Journal Citation Reports”® released by Thomson Reuters. International Security’s 2014 Impact Factor is the highest of any international relations journals.

Nadia Marzouki is an Andrew Carnegie Centennial Fellow, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, and a research fellow at the Belfer Center’s Middle East Initiative.

Belfer Center

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Center for the National Interest Belfer Center Newsletter

Deconstructing Islamophobia by Emphasizing Individuality

    Author:
  • Bret Hauff
| Summer 2017

It’s this distorted perception of the Muslim identity that Nadia Marzouki is working to dissolve. Her research focuses on the society’s perceptions of Muslims in an effort to deconstruct ignorance about Islam through emphasizing individuals’ autonomy to accept—or reject—societal structures.

satellite images of what the State Department described as a building in a prison complex in Syria that was modified to support a crematorium

State Department/DigitalGlobe via AP

Analysis & Opinions - War on the Rocks

How to Get Away with Mass Murder: Denying Mass Atrocities in Sri Lanka and Syria

| May 18, 2017

"Much has been made of the example set by Sri Lanka's ruthless strategy as an alternative to 'hearts and minds' counterinsurgency efforts. Governments battling stubborn militant movements continue to seek advice from Colombo on employing the 'Rajapaksa model.' But the successful elimination of the LTTE in 2009 wasn't the only unexpected feat Sri Lanka accomplished. It also managed to preempt international action long enough to conclude its brutal campaign, despite state-perpetrated civilian casualties on a massive scale. Syria, where more than 200,000 civilians have died since 2011, is poised to test the limits of this precedent."

Nicholas Burns on Bloomberg's "What'd You Miss?"

Bloomberg.com

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg

Nicholas Burns discusses President Trump meeting with Erdogan

| May 16, 2017

Nicholas Burns, a Harvard Kennedy School professor, discusses President Donald Trump's meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the fallout from his intelligence disclosures to Russian diplomats. He speaks with Bloomberg's Joe Weisenthal, Julia Chatterley and Scarlet Fu on "What'd You Miss?" 

 Viet Minh troops are surrounded by civilians as they enter Hanoi

AP

Journal Article - Security Studies

Who Can Keep the Peace? Insurgent Organizational Control of Collective Violence

| 2017

Every armed organization seeks the ability to turn violence on and off by getting fighters to fight when ordered and to stop fighting when similarly ordered. This ability is a defining feature of what makes organized violence, in fact, organized. While state militaries develop clear hierarchies and disciplinary procedures to accomplish this goal, the complexity of civil war makes the task more difficult for insurgent groups. The author argues that the leaders of insurgent organizations are able to turn violence on and off when they have deliberately established resource control through the direct, and exclusive, distribution of resources to their followers and those followers are socially embedded, meaning that members are united by strong horizontal ties and group norms.

silhouettes of U.N. peacekeepers from Brazil at the airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Aljazeera

UN Peacekeepers: Keeping the Peace or Preventing It?

| May 02, 2017

"While it is incontrovertible that peacekeepers who abuse civilian populations should be prosecuted for their crimes, these individual trials are not enough. Peacekeeper violence should be treated with the same seriousness as other types of conflict-related sexual violence. National contingents should be more thoroughly vetted before deployment, and stronger monitoring and disciplinary sanctions should be imposed to prevent and punish violations on the ground. Without these comprehensive measures, UN peacekeeping forces will not only fail in their mission to create the conditions for lasting peace, they will be one of the driving forces behind a resurgence of violence — wherever they go."