Economics & Global Affairs

1584 Items

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, listen to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's statement at the end of the BRICS summit in Goa, India, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, or BRICS, face the tough task of asserting their growing influence as a power group even as they bridge their own trade rivalries to help grow their economies. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

(AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Analysis & Opinions - The Straits Times

Trump inaugurates the end of the end of the Cold War

| Feb. 03, 2017

While all the attention on US President Donald Trump has been fixated on his controversial policy moves, what should capture the world's attention is its strategic future. That future involves a new relationship between the US, Russia and China. It predicts the end of the end of the Cold War. It is Russia, however, that could emerge as the new international kingpin and the balancer of power between the US and China.

Trader Daniel Ryan works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. Stock indexes are barely budging in early trading on Wall Street as investors look over a large batch of earnings reports from U.S. companies. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The stock market has boomed under Trump. What happens next might scare you.

| Jan. 29, 2017

This week the "Trump Rally" continued as the Dow Jones Industrial Average crossed 20,000, and our president issued a celebratory. How much does this mean? To what extent is it a vindication of the economic policy approaches pursued by the new Administration? Will the post-election rally continue? 

donald trump at cia

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

America's New President Is Not a Rational Actor

| Jan. 25, 2017

"Government bureaucrats have been held in low regard for a long time, which makes them an easy target. But you also can't do anything in public policy without their assistance, and my guess is that Americans will be mighty unhappy when budget cuts, firings, resignations, and the like reduce government performance even more. Get ready for a steady drip, drip, drip of leaks and stories emanating from dedicated civil servants who are committed to advancing the public interest and aren't going to like being treated with contempt and disdain by a bunch of hedge fund managers, wealthy Wall Streeters, or empty suits like Energy Secretary Rick Perry, all led by President Pinocchio."

In this Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds up a signed Presidential Memorandum in the Oval Office in Washington. Just two days after banning travelers from seven Muslim-majority nations, U.S. President Donald Trump invited the Saudi monarch, whose kingdom includes Islam’s holiest sites, to fly to Washington. It points to the delicate balancing act Trump faces as he tries to deliver on campaign promises to exterminate “radical Islamic terrorism” without endangering political and

AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File

Analysis & Opinions - The New Republic

Trump’s Foreign Policy Chaos

| Jan. 23, 2017

There is more to today’s prevailing gloom than concern about routine acts of terror. There is also a sense of strategic disorientation: After nearly three quarters of a century, the foundations of the liberal world order are giving way. In Europe, tepid growth, demographic decline, Russian revanchism and resurgent populism are testing the durability of Western cohesion.

Blog Post - Views on the Economy and the World

Outlook for 2017

| Jan. 03, 2017
Five journalist’s questions about the economic outlook in the New Year and my answers: In the first year of Trump’s presidency, what do you predict for the US economy in 2017?The US economy is currently at or near full employment, for the first time in 9 years.  So there is limited capacity for an acceleration of growth in the medium term.  Mr. Trump is fairly likely to follow through with his proposals for massive tax cuts and spending increases (which the economy needed 5 years ago, but were blocked by Republicans).

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The 2016 Iranian Parliamentary Elections and the Future of Domestic Politics under the JCPOA

| December 2016

As President-elect Donald Drumpf prepares to take office, the status of the nuclear deal signed between Iran and world powers is increasingly coming under question.  Since the nuclear agreement was the product of a realignment of Iranian elites toward moderate forces, the unravelling of the agreement holds the potential to disrupt Iranian politics once again. This report, The 2016 Iranian Parliamentary Elections and the Future of Domestic Politics under the JCPOA, by Iran Project Director Payam Mohseni, provides an in-depth analysis of Iran's factional political scene and assesses the impact of the agreement on the 2016 Iranian parliamentary elections and the future of Iranian politics.