Economics & Global Affairs

284 Items

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump pose for a photo with Chinese President Xi Jingping and his wife, Mrs. Peng Liyuan, Thursday, April 6, 2017, at the entrance of Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, FL (Official White Photo by D. Myles Cullen)

Official White Photo by D. Myles Cullen

Magazine Article - The Atlantic

What Xi Jinping Wants

| May 31, 2017

"Within a month of becoming China’s leader in 2012, Xi specified deadlines for meeting each of his 'Two Centennial Goals.' First, China will build a 'moderately prosperous society' by doubling its 2010 per capita GDP to $10,000 by 2021, when it celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party. Second, it will become a 'fully developed, rich, and powerful' nation by the 100th anniversary of the People's Republic in 2049. If China reaches the first goal— which it is on course to do—the IMF estimates that its economy will be 40 percent larger than that of the U.S. (measured in terms of purchasing power parity). If China meets the second target by 2049, its economy will be triple America's."

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, with their wives, first lady Melania Trump and Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan are seated during a dinner at Mar-a-Lago, Thursday, April 6, 2017, in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner are seated at left. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The most important economic challenge that China poses

| Apr. 09, 2017

Focusing on China’s trade deficit with the United States is largely misguided. Yes, China subsidizes various exports to the rest of the world in a number of ways. But if the United States succeeds in stopping the subsidies or blocking the subsidized products, the result will be that companies will shift production to Vietnam and other low-wage countries—not create good jobs in the United States.

From right, Cathay Pacific Chief Operating Officer Rupert Hogg, Chairman John Slosar, Chief Executive Ivan Chu and Finance Director Martin Murray attend a news conference as they announce the company result in Hong Kong, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific Airways has posted its first annual loss in almost a decade, blaming it on tough competition from rival airlines, slowing Chinese economic growth and a stronger currency. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

Analysis & Opinions - South China Morning Post

Why Hong Kong and Singapore must help their airlines soar

| Mar. 21, 2017

Derwin Pereira says no laissez-faire principles can be prized more than the symbolic importance of Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines to each territory. Both are premium Asian airlines. Both are under pressure from upstarts in other parts of Asia and even in their own regional backyards. And both need their governments to accord them the courtesy given to national institutions.

A currency trader calculates Malaysian ringgit notes at a currency exchange store in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

(AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Addicted to Dollars

| Mar. 02, 2017

Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, listen to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's statement at the end of the BRICS summit in Goa, India, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, or BRICS, face the tough task of asserting their growing influence as a power group even as they bridge their own trade rivalries to help grow their economies. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

(AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Analysis & Opinions - The Straits Times

Trump inaugurates the end of the end of the Cold War

| Feb. 03, 2017

While all the attention on US President Donald Trump has been fixated on his controversial policy moves, what should capture the world's attention is its strategic future. That future involves a new relationship between the US, Russia and China. It predicts the end of the end of the Cold War. It is Russia, however, that could emerge as the new international kingpin and the balancer of power between the US and China.