Economics & Global Affairs

848 Items

In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, Argentine President Mauricio Macri talks during a news conference at the government house in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Macri's government defended on Tuesday, Feb. 21, an accord between the government and a company lead by his father over a debt acquired when the company ran the Argentine postal service. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)

AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

One Hundred Years of Indebtedness

| June 30, 2017

Gabriel Garcia Márquez, the Nobel laureate novelist most famous for One Hundred Years of Solitude, was native to Colombia. Nonetheless, as a master of magical realism, Garcia Márquez would have appreciated the Republic of Argentina’s recent combination of fact and fantasy. In mid-June, the finance ministry sold $2.75 billion worth of US dollar-denominated bonds that mature in one hundred years.

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Blog Post - views-on-the-economy-and-the-world

The Case Against Subsidizing Housing Debt

| May 29, 2017

Economists hesitate to explain to people that they should borrow less. The advice sounds too “schoolmarmish.” It seems to lack sympathy for those whose incomes are not keeping up with the standard of living that they had expected based on historical trends. But for those concerned with the reach of the nanny state, the state is precisely what encourages citizens to borrow. And it does nobody any favors to get them overly indebted, as the millions of homeowners who went underwater in the housing crisis ten years ago discovered.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney holds up a copy of President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget as he speaks to members of the media in the Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Larry Summers: Trump’s budget is simply ludicrous

| May 23, 2017

"Apparently, the budget forecasts that U.S. economic growth will rise to 3.0 percent because of the administration’s policies — largely its tax cuts and perhaps also its regulatory policies.  Fair enough if you believe in tooth fairies and ludicrous supply-side economics."

ibrahim raisi

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

How Iran's Hard-Liners Are Challenging Rouhani (From the Left)

| May 18, 2017

Although Rouhani has an incumbent’s advantage, his promised economic revival is seen by many as having fallen short of his stated goals, and he has been the target of unceasing and strong allegations of corruption. Despite the fact that every Iranian president in the post-Khomeini period has served two terms, why is Rouhani in a precarious position? And what are the factors that anti-Rouhani forces are trying to use to their advantage? In an article to The National Interest, Payam Mohseni, Director of the Belfer Center's Iran Project, shows that recalling the lessons of the 2005 election, which brought Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to power, serves as a useful model in understanding this year’s contest and the challenges Rouhani faces in maintaining power.

The U.S. Federal Reserve Bank Building, home to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, is seen in Washington, Friday, April 25, 2014. Often referred to as “the Fed,” it is the nation’s central banking system and sets monetary policy for the United States. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Larry Summers on the future of banking

| May 02, 2017

"I guessed that 10 years from now, the odds that there would be a fintech company with the kind of $250 billion market cap that some big American banks have was about 25 percent. I did not expect that in the foreseeable future fintech would have the kind of existential impact on banks that Netflix has had on Blockbuster."