Environment & Climate Change

164 Items

Shanghai

Creative Commons

Journal Article - Environmental Research Letters

Air Quality and Climate Benefits of Long-distance Electricity Transmission in China

    Authors:
  • Jiahai Yuan
  • Yu Zhao
  • Meiyun Lin
  • Qiang Zhang
  • David G. Victor
  • Denise L. Mauzerall
| 2017

China is the world's top carbon emitter and suffers from severe air pollution. It has recently made commitments to improve air quality and to peak its CO2 emissions by 2030. The authors examine one strategy that can potentially address both issues—utilizing long-distance electricity transmission to bring renewable power to the polluted eastern provinces. 

Visitors in a park gesture at each other near chimneys spewing smoke in Beijing, China

AP

Journal Article - Science of the Total Environment

Substantial Air Quality and Climate Co-benefits Achievable Now with Sectoral Mitigation Strategies in China

    Authors:
  • Junnan Yang
  • Fabian Wagner
  • Denise L. Mauzerall
| November 2017

China is the world's top carbon emitter and suffers from severe air pollution. The authors examine near-term air quality and CO2 co-benefits of various current sector-based policies in China. Their analysis hence highlights the importance of even modest industrial energy efficiency improvements and air pollution control technology upgrades for air quality, health and climate benefits in China.

A worker waits to shovel coal to feed kitchen stoves at the Liuminying village in Beijing, China

AP

Journal Article - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Air Quality, Health, and Climate Implications of China’s Synthetic Natural Gas Development

    Authors:
  • Yue Qin
  • Fabian Wagner
  • Noah Scovronick
  • Junnan Yang
  • Tong Zhu
  • Kirk R. Smith
  • Denise L. Mauzerall
| Mar. 06, 2017

China’s coal-based synthetic natural gas (SNG) projects can reduce air pollution and associated premature mortality by substituting for direct coal use in power, industry, and households. These benefits, however, come with increased CO2 emissions unless carbon capture and storage (CCS) is applied in SNG production. Even with CCS, SNG has higher CO2 emissions than conventional natural gas. In the United States, increases in natural gas supplies have been primarily deployed to the power sector. In China, however, due to inefficient and uncontrolled coal combustion in households, we find that allocating currently available SNG to the residential sector provides the largest air quality and health benefits and smallest climate penalties compared with allocation to the power or industrial sectors.

Panel: What does Brexit mean for Europe's security architecture?

Thomas Lobenwein

Report

Brave new world? What Trump and Brexit mean for European foreign policy

| Dec. 08, 2016

On 24 and 25 November 2016 experts from politics and academia, including FDP Executive director Cathryn Clüver, discussed the impact of Brexit on several policy areas in a series of workshops at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. All events took place under Chatham House rules.

Panelists Marshall Ganz, HKS (L); Julia Liou, Asian Health Services; Matthew Tejada, U.S. EPA; Natalicia Tracy, Brazilian Worker Center; Trip Van Noppen, Earthjustice

Bennett Craig, Belfer Center

News

Healthier Nail Salons

    Author:
  • Jessica Colarossi
| Nov. 21, 2016

For more than a decade, the California Healthy Nail Salon Collaborative has sought to improve the health, safety, and rights of low-paid, vulnerable immigrant workers in a poorly regulated part of the beauty care industry. A recent Harvard Kennedy School panel discussion on "Toxic Beauty: Environmental Justice and Workers' Rights," featured the innovative California initiative and its selection as the winner of the 2016 Roy Family Award for Environmental Partnership.

In 2011, science advisors to the presidents of China and the United States, Wan Gang and John P. Holdren, hold a photo of the historic 1979 U.S.-China agreement on science and engineering.

USDA

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Center's Energy Work Wields Impact and Influence Around the World

| Fall/Winter 2016-2017

The Belfer Center began researching energy technology issues in the late 1990s. Its mission was “to determine and promote the adoption of effective strategies for developing and deploying cleaner and more efficient energy technologies that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce dependence on fossil fuels and stress on water resources, and improve economic development.”

In this issue, we look at the history and influence of the Center’s energy innovation efforts in the past two decades by focusing primarily on ETIP’s work in the U.S. and China.

President Barack Obama gets direction from his science advisor John P. Holdren during an event on the South Lawn of the White House to explore the stars with middle school students.

Reuters

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Spotlight on John P. Holdren

| Fall/Winter 2016-2017

As assistant to the president for science and technology, director of the White House Office for Science and Technology Policy, and co-chair of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), Holdren has worked closely with Obama to reinvigorate America’s scientific capabilities on a range of policy fronts, from climate change and renewable energy to health care and nanotechnology.

Analysis & Opinions - Sacramento Bee

New Emissions Targets Make Cap and Trade the Best Low-cost, Market-based Approach

| October 30, 2016

"The environmental justice lobby's concerns about local air pollution are justified: A new report by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights acknowledges that low-income and minority communities face disproportionately high air pollution. The best response to this situation is to strengthen existing local pollution laws rather than abandon cap and trade."

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Analysis & Opinions - WIRED

To Help Cool the Climate, Add Aerosol

| October 5, 2016

"Of course, solar geoengineering alone cannot stabilize the climate. The world must cut carbon dioxide emissions. But solar geoengineering is unique because it can help address already committed climate change—future climate change locked in due to past emissions. Cutting carbon emissions alone will not have immediate effects, given the length of time that carbon already in the atmosphere stays there."