Environment & Climate Change

394 Items

Marines stand near an artillery piece that links to solar panels during an exhibition of green energy technology in Twentynine Palms, Calif.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - PBS NEWSHOUR

Why the U.S. Should Remain in the Paris Climate Agreement

| Apr. 27, 2017

It was reported that today there would be a meeting in the White House where the President's key advisers will discuss whether the United States should remain a party to the Paris climate agreement. With this in mind, the authors reflect in this essay on the history of international climate negotiations, observe why this is a pivotal moment, and explain why they think that the United States should remain in the Paris agreement.

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, meet at an hotel in Vienna, July 9, 2015

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Scientific American

How International Cooperation in Research Advances Both Science and Diplomacy

| Apr. 27, 2017

"The partial budget blueprint released by the White House recently will put U.S. leadership in science and technology at serious risk if Congress goes along. In addition to the obvious damage that would result from the proposed $5.8 billion cut at NIH, the $2 billion cut in applied energy R&D, the $900 million cut in DOE’s Office of Science, the abolition of ARPA-E, and the research cuts at NOAA and EPA, a less immediately obvious potential casualty would be U.S. scientific cooperation with a wide variety of other countries on a wide variety of topics."

Emissions from coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H.

AP

Policy Brief - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

The United States and the Paris Agreement: A Pivotal Moment

| April 2017

The authors break down the reasons for the United States to stay in the Paris Climate Agreement, arguing that the benefits far outweigh any potential costs. The Agreement gives the United States a seat at the table, and the ability to influence international policy on climate change, showing that the United States is open and willing to cooperate.

Ban Ki-Moon

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center

Conversations in Diplomacy: Ban Ki-moon

| Apr. 24, 2017

In a conversation with Professor Nicholas Burns, Ban Ki-Moon, who served as UN Secretary-General from 2007 to December 2016, touches upon his transition from the diplomatic to the academic world, UN efforts to confront climate change under his leadership, and reconciling political realities with the achievement of long-term, global aims.

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project Receives Award from Harvard University Climate Fund for Second Year

| Mar. 20, 2017

The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements received a grant in March 2017 from the Harvard University Climate Change Solutions Fund for the second year in a row, along with six other programs and projects at Harvard University.

Filling the (Green) Vacuum

The Mark News

Analysis & Opinions - The Mark News

Filling the (Green) Vacuum

| Mar. 06, 2017

The transition from President Obama to President Trump has triggered fears that the new administration will overturn many of the policies, programs and successes of the last eight years. These fears are especially strong concerning the issue of climate change.

While the policies of the new White House are still unclear, President Trump has appointed a number of people who have opposed the climate initiatives and, in some cases, expressed skepticism that the human induced climate threat even exists.

The concern in many circles is that the administration will walk away from the Paris Agreement and repudiate the ambitious emission reduction targets set out in the U.S.-China bilateral agreement signed by Presidents Obama and Xi Jinping in November 2014.

 

In this April 2, 2010, file photo, a Tesoro Corp. refinery, including a gas flare flame that is part of normal plant operations, is shown in Anacortes, Wash. after a fatal overnight fire and explosion. Voters in Washington state will weigh in on Initiative 732 in the 2016 election as they consider whether to approve the nation’s first direct carbon tax on the burning of fossil fuels.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

A Conservative Case for Climate Action

| Feb. 08, 2017

During his eight years in office, President Obama regularly warned of the very real dangers of global warming, but he did not sign any meaningful domestic legislation to address the problem, largely because he and Congress did not see eye to eye. Instead, Mr. Obama left us with a grab bag of regulations aimed at reducing carbon emissions, o en established by executive order. 

teaser image

Magazine Article - Forbes

U.S. Ambassador To India Richard Verma Leaves A Lasting Legacy To Follow

| Feb. 03, 2017

Richard Verma’s two-year tenure as U.S. Ambassador to India concluded last month with the new incoming presidential administration. During his time in New Delhi, Verma established himself as one of the most consequential envoys to ever occupy the prestigious post once held by such foreign policy legends as John Kenneth Galbraith and Frank Wisner. The first Indian American to serve in the role, Verma leaves behind a far-reaching legacy. He raised the U.S-India strategic partnership to unparalleled heights in virtually every arena of bilateral cooperation while serving as a skilled and talented public diplomat.

COP 22 panel

Mike Muzurakis/IISD/ENB

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project on Climate Agreements' Participation in COP-22

| Jan. 31, 2017

The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements conducted two side-event panels at the Twenty-Second Conference of the Parties (COP-22) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held in Marrakech, Morocco November 7–18, 2016. COP-22 focused on elaborating the Paris Agreement, which was adopted at COP-21 in December 2015 and which entered into force on November 4, 2016. Although the Paris Agreement represents a major step forward in efforts to address global climate change, much remains to be done to specify the rules and guidelines required to fully implement the Agreement, which primarily deals with action after 2020.