Governance

3635 Items

Blog Post - Iran Matters

Cracking Down on Iran through Turkey

    Author:
  • Engin Sune
| Apr. 20, 2017

The case of Halkbank reveals a short-term disjointed relationship between Turkey and Iran. The Turkish government cites Halkbank’s economic success as evidence of a rising Turkey. Regarding the transfer of 51% of the bank’s share to the newly established Turkish Sovereign Wealth Fund in February 2017, the bank occupies a central role in the domestic and international policies of the Turkish state. For Iran, on the other hand, this relationship was a part of the ongoing strategy of creating alternative mechanisms to bypass the impact of sanctions. Therefore, there was a mutual economic interest for both countries, with Halkbank acting as a facilitator of this exchange. And while economic interest was at the core of the relationship, this cooperation established between Iran and Turkey spilled over into the political sphere in a limited manner. The political relations between Turkey and Iran have continued to fluctuate, stifling any possibility of a meaningful long-term political alliance. A number of recent regional and domestic developments have set further constrains on the emergence of a Turkey-Iran partnership.

U.S. Capitol

Kevin McCoy CC

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Some Thoughts on the Scientists' March

| Apr. 19, 2017

Understandable concerns have been expressed by some in the scientific community that marching on April 22 will make scientists look like "just another interest group" or "just worried about their jobs" or that they will be seen as "politicizing science." After considerable reflection and discussion with a number of science-community leaders, John P. Holdren, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at Harvard University has reached the following conclusions about this issue. 

Jared Kushner at Mar-a-Lago meeting

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Jared Kushner Will Be Eaten by the Blob

| Apr. 17, 2017

"Indeed, Kushner’s role in the White House actually reveals a deeper problem: Trump doesn't actually care if his policies work or not. He doesn't care if health care is ever fixed, if the climate warms up and millions of people die, if coal miners or autoworkers get new and better jobs, if the Islamic State is ever defeated, or if U.S. infrastructure is rebuilt. All he cares about is whether he can convince people that he's responsible for anything good that happens and persuade them that adverse developments are someone else's fault. It has been apparent from day one that Trump cares first and foremost about himself, his family, and his fortune. Full stop. Doing the people's business — that is, actually governing — is hard work, and it really cuts into the time you can spend on the golf course."

raqi Army checkpoint flying an Iraqi flag next to a Kurdish checkpoint with a Kurdish flag, outside Irbil, northern Iraq

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

For Iraqi Kurds, Trump Brings Hope for Independence

| Apr. 12, 2017

On a recent trip to Iraqi Kurdistan, the author spoke with numerous politicians, officials, and businessmen who believe that the Trump presidency has created new opportunities for Kurdish independence. The Kurdish public, moreover, has been generally optimistic about Trump since his election. Yet the aspects of the Trump presidency that most excite Iraqi Kurds are the same ones that have U.S. foreign policy experts most concerned.

Trump Twitter Feed

AP

Analysis & Opinions - MarketWatch

What I Tell My Non-American Friends about Trump

| Apr. 12, 2017

"It is still early in the Trump presidency, and we cannot be sure what might happen after, say, a major terrorist attack. So far, however, the courts, the Congress, and the states have checked and balanced the administration, as Madison intended. And the permanent civil servants in the executive departments add ballast."

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

Haaretz

Analysis & Opinions

Does Ahmadinejad Have a Chance?

| Apr. 12, 2017

Former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has registered to run in Iran’s presidential elections in May, despite having been advised not to do so by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Payam Mohseni, director of the Iran Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center, emails CNN Fareed Zakaria's Global Briefing that Ahmadinejad’s entry is a genuine surprise, and that just registering could be seen as an act of defiance.

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, with their wives, first lady Melania Trump and Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan are seated during a dinner at Mar-a-Lago, Thursday, April 6, 2017, in Palm Beach, Fla. Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner are seated at left. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The most important economic challenge that China poses

| Apr. 09, 2017

Focusing on China’s trade deficit with the United States is largely misguided. Yes, China subsidizes various exports to the rest of the world in a number of ways. But if the United States succeeds in stopping the subsidies or blocking the subsidized products, the result will be that companies will shift production to Vietnam and other low-wage countries—not create good jobs in the United States.