Governance

39 Items

A newspaper vendor stands in front of a poster of the late Lee Kuan Yew in the financial district of Singapore on Monday, March 23, 2015. Singaporeans wept and world leaders paid tribute Monday as the Southeast Asian city-state mourned the death of its founding father Lee Kuan Yew. The government announced that Lee, 91, "passed away peacefully" several hours before dawn at Singapore General Hospital. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

Analysis & Opinions - The Straits Times

Symbol of the Singapore story

| June 24, 2017

Singapore's founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew was no ordinary Singaporean. His house is no ordinary house. These facts give Singaporeans a stake in its preservation, no matter how the tussle among his children ends.

As a citizen and former journalist who met him several times, the symbolic meaning of the house for me takes precedence over Mr Lee's own will. From a strictly legal perspective, the will says the last word on what should be done to 38, Oxley Road. But from a national perspective, the demolition of the house would represent a blow to a visual artefact that represents the nation's journey from Third World to First.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with Russian businessmen in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016.

(AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

A Blueprint for Donald Trump to Fix Relations with Russia

| December 18, 2016

In a "policy memo" to President-elect Donald Trump, Graham Allison and Dimitri K. Simes write: "The two Chinese characters that make up the word “crisis” can be interpreted as meaning both “danger” and “opportunity.” Russia today offers your administration not only a serious challenge but a significant opportunity.

Russia is no longer the Evil Empire the United States confronted over decades of Cold War. Nonetheless, Russia remains a player whose choices affect vital U.S. interests profoundly across the agenda of global issues. First and foremost, Russia remains the only nation that can erase the United States from the map in thirty minutes.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy at the White House on Oct. 1, 1962 during the buildup of tensions that became the Cuban Missile Crisis.

AP

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Applying Lessons of History to Today's Choices and Challenges

| Fall/Winter 2016-2017

It is sometimes said that some Americans live in “the United States of Amnesia.” Less widely recognized is how many American policymakers live there, too. To address this deficit, the Belfer Center has launched an Applied History Project designed to revitalize applied history both in universities and in policymaking.

Dallas skyline and suburbs

Andreas Praefcke, 30 September 2009

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The decline of the middle class is causing even more economic damage than we realized

| September 29, 2016

I have just come across an International Monetary Fund working paper on income polarization in the United States that makes an important contribution to the secular stagnation debate. The authors — Ali Alichi, Kory Kantenga and Juan Solé — use standard econometric techniques to estimate the impact of declines in middle class incomes on total consumer spending. They find that polarization has reduced consumer spending by more than 3 percent or about $400 billion annually. If these findings stand up to scrutiny, they deserve to have a policy impact.

Hanan Al Hroub (second from right) speaks with students from the Harvard Kennedy School and Graduate School of Education during her visit to Harvard, September 22, 2016.

Bennett Craig, Belfer Center

News

Askwith Forum: Education as a Human Right with Hanan Al Hroub

September 22, 2016

A video recording from the Harvard Graduate School of Education's Askwith Forum on September 22, 2016, featuring Hanan Al Hroub, recipient of the 2016 Global Teacher Prize from the Varkey Foundation and a teacher at Samiha Khalil Secondary School in Palestine. Ms. Al Hroub delievered a public address on the topic of "Education as a Human Right" and discussed her experiences as a Palestinian educator and her unique approach to instruction.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton walks from her daughter Chelsea's apartment building Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016, in New York.

AP Photo/Craig Ruttle

Analysis & Opinions - TIME / time.com

Women Are Taught to Work Through Sickness and Pain

| September 13, 2016

Although Jen Palmieri, Hillary Clinton’s communications director, acknowledged that the campaign should have let the press know sooner that Secretary Clinton was fine, following her leaving the 9/11 memorial for health reasons on Sunday, working women have known for decades that even when you’re sick, you work. Mothers joke that they aren’t allowed to get sick, and advertisers rake in profits for cold and flu relievers that allow moms to go on doing their jobs. And women in the workplace, often judged for how strong or weak they are, regularly come to work even when they should be home in bed—even when society should allow for rest and recovery.

I learned this lesson early in life. During my early professional years, somehow my body knew it had to wait to get sick until it was time for annual leave. So I ended up spending my vacation time nursing bad sinus infections or flu, before flu shots. Later in my professional career, I simply learned to soldier on, no matter what.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy, right, confers with his brother Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy at the White House on Oct. 1, 1962 during the buildup of military tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union that became the Cuban missile crisis.

AP Photo

Magazine Article - The Atlantic

Why the President Needs a Council of Historians

| September 2016

We urge the next president to establish a White House Council of Historical Advisers. Historians made similar recommendations to Presidents Carter and Reagan during their administrations, but nothing ever came of these proposals. Operationally, the Council of Historical Advisers would mirror the Council of Economic Advisers, established after World War II. A chair and two additional members would be appointed by the president to full-time positions, and respond to assignments from him or her. They would be supported by a small professional staff and would be part of the Executive Office of the President.

- Belfer Center Newsletter

Faculty Interview: Working 'Smart' in Saudi Arabia: Asim Khwaja on Transformation in the Kingdom and the Future of Policymaking

| August 24, 2016

An interview with MEI Faculty Affiliate Asim Khwaja on his work at the Center for International Development's Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) program with the Saudi Ministry of Labor on labor market policy as well as EPoD's Smart Policy Design and Implementation methodology and implications for the future of informed, iterative policymaking.

How Global Corporations Should Confront Pervasive Distrust

Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - Fortune

How Global Corporations Should Confront Pervasive Distrust

| July 12, 2016

Corporations have been attacked from both right and left during the 2016 presidential election: on trade, on immigration, on campaign finance, on crony capitalism, on inequality. Fortune Editor and long-time political reporter Alan Murray says business-government relations in the U.S. are “easily the worst in the three decades I’ve covered them.” But the current across-the-spectrum, anti-corporate distemper and distrust is a global trend as reflected in the Brexit vote which overrode consensus concerns about injury to both UK and non-UK business.