International Relations

4204 Items

Journal Article - Science and Engineering Ethics

On Effectiveness and Legitimacy of 'Shaming' as a Strategy for Combatting Climate Change

| Forthcoming

While states have agreed to substantial reduction of emissions in the Paris Agreement, the success of the Agreement strongly depends on the cooperation of large Multinational Corporations. Short of legal obligations, the authors discuss the effectiveness and moral legitimacy of voluntary approaches based on naming and shaming. They argue that effectiveness and legitimacy are closely tied together; as voluntary approaches are the only alternative to legally imposed duties, they are most morally defensible particularly if they would be the most effective in reducing the harmful greenhouse gases

Marines stand near an artillery piece that links to solar panels during an exhibition of green energy technology in Twentynine Palms, Calif.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - PBS NEWSHOUR

Why the U.S. Should Remain in the Paris Climate Agreement

| Apr. 27, 2017

It was reported that today there would be a meeting in the White House where the President's key advisers will discuss whether the United States should remain a party to the Paris climate agreement. With this in mind, the authors reflect in this essay on the history of international climate negotiations, observe why this is a pivotal moment, and explain why they think that the United States should remain in the Paris agreement.

Cluver, Chaudhry and Najam

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - India and South Asia Project

Conversations in Diplomacy: Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry and Adil Najam

| Apr. 27, 2017

Pakistan's Ambassador to the U.S. Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry and Dean of the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University Adil Najam discuss the ups and downs of US-Pakistan relations and possibilities for engagement under the new US administration.

Donald Trump and Xi Jinping at Mar-a-Lago, Florida

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Worst Mistake of Trump's First 100 Days

| Apr. 26, 2017

"...[B]ut in the long run Trump's biggest mistake has been his clueless approach to Asia. Europe is important, but its current problems are mostly internal and the United States cannot do much to address them. The Middle East is a mess, of course, but the United States does not need to fix it, does not know how to fix it, and shouldn't waste time, money, or soldiers' lives trying to fix it. Trump may find himself dragged back into the Middle East cauldron — especially if he tries to get tough with Iran — but his missteps there have done little damage so far (fingers crossed)."

Emissions from coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H.

AP

Policy Brief - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

The United States and the Paris Agreement: A Pivotal Moment

| April 2017

The authors break down the reasons for the United States to stay in the Paris Climate Agreement, arguing that the benefits far outweigh any potential costs. The Agreement gives the United States a seat at the table, and the ability to influence international policy on climate change, showing that the United States is open and willing to cooperate.

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

AP/Wong Maye-E

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

    Authors:
  • Keir A. Lieber
  • Daryl Press
| Spring 2017

For decades, nuclear deterrence has depended on the impossibility of a first strike destroying a country’s nuclear arsenal. Technological advances, however, are undermining states’ abilities to hide and protect their nuclear arsenals. These developments help explain why nuclear-armed states have continued to engage in security competition: nuclear deterrence is neither automatic nor permanent. Thus, the United States should enhance its counterforce capabilities and avoid reducing its nuclear arsenal.

Donald Trump and Jared Kushner in Oval Office

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump Has Learned a Lot. But He's Neglecting a Huge Part of American Leadership.

| Apr. 25, 2017

"The system the United States created has been called a liberal international order, because openness produces public goods available to all. But the label is confusing because it covers political-military affairs, economic relations, ecological relations and even promotion of liberal values. It remains to be seen to what degree these different aspects depend on each other and what the result will be if Trump unpacks the post-1945 package."

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Harvard President Faust Links History and Leadership

| Spring 2017

For nearly ten years, Harvard's President Drew Gilpin Faust has led the university with a historian's perspective. On June 30, she joined the Belfer Center's Applied History Project Faculty Working Group and shared her views on applying history to current situations.

Simon Saradzhyan and Natasha Yefimova-Trilling interview former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd about Russia and its relationship with Australia. (Benn Craig)

Benn Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

New Russia Matters Website Highlights Facts, Dispels Myths

    Author:
  • Natasha Yefimova-Trilling
| Spring 2017

Russia once again dominates headlines, but U.S. expertise on the country is in demonstrable decline. With the launch of its new website, Russia Matters hopes to bring clarity to U.S. citizens following Russia-related news.

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- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Q&A: Immigration and Terrorism

| Spring 2017

In response to the Trump administration’s rollout of aggressive policies on immigration and travel, Farah Pandith and Ayaan Hirsi Ali­—both senior fellows with the Belfer Center’s Future of Diplomacy Project—have shared their contrasting views in media interviews.