International Relations

346 Items

From right, Cathay Pacific Chief Operating Officer Rupert Hogg, Chairman John Slosar, Chief Executive Ivan Chu and Finance Director Martin Murray attend a news conference as they announce the company result in Hong Kong, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific Airways has posted its first annual loss in almost a decade, blaming it on tough competition from rival airlines, slowing Chinese economic growth and a stronger currency. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

Analysis & Opinions - South China Morning Post

Why Hong Kong and Singapore must help their airlines soar

| Mar. 21, 2017

Derwin Pereira says no laissez-faire principles can be prized more than the symbolic importance of Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines to each territory. Both are premium Asian airlines. Both are under pressure from upstarts in other parts of Asia and even in their own regional backyards. And both need their governments to accord them the courtesy given to national institutions.

A boy flies a Saltire over the Palace of Westminster

New Statesman

Analysis & Opinions - New Statesman

Why sentiment, not statistics, will sway the next Scottish referendum

| Mar. 17, 2017

This week, we discovered that Nicola Sturgeon’s answer to new divisions, grievances and borders is . . . more divisions, grievances and borders. Since the vote on 23 June last year, it has become fashionable for some on the “liberal left” south of the border to cope with their Brexit grief by supporting, for Scotland, more nationalism as the answer to nationalism. According to this perspective, the rise of nationalism across Europe is negative, except on this island.

Michael Anton before Trump news conference

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

How Not to Fix the Liberal World Order

| Mar. 06, 2017

"Like the president he now serves, Anton doesn't understand how the global trading order actually works. Trade agreements are long and complicated today because they are no longer primarily concerned with reducing tariffs (which are already quite low). Instead, contemporary trade agreements are mostly about harmonizing labor, regulatory, environmental, and copyright standards across many different societies, precisely for the purpose of creating fairer competition between states. Agreements of this kind are very much in America's interest, because otherwise U.S. workers would have to compete with foreign industries where labor and environmental standards are much lower than they are in the United States."

A currency trader calculates Malaysian ringgit notes at a currency exchange store in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

(AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Addicted to Dollars

| Mar. 02, 2017

Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.

donald trump at cia

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

America's New President Is Not a Rational Actor

| Jan. 25, 2017

"Government bureaucrats have been held in low regard for a long time, which makes them an easy target. But you also can't do anything in public policy without their assistance, and my guess is that Americans will be mighty unhappy when budget cuts, firings, resignations, and the like reduce government performance even more. Get ready for a steady drip, drip, drip of leaks and stories emanating from dedicated civil servants who are committed to advancing the public interest and aren't going to like being treated with contempt and disdain by a bunch of hedge fund managers, wealthy Wall Streeters, or empty suits like Energy Secretary Rick Perry, all led by President Pinocchio."

In this Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds up a signed Presidential Memorandum in the Oval Office in Washington. Just two days after banning travelers from seven Muslim-majority nations, U.S. President Donald Trump invited the Saudi monarch, whose kingdom includes Islam’s holiest sites, to fly to Washington. It points to the delicate balancing act Trump faces as he tries to deliver on campaign promises to exterminate “radical Islamic terrorism” without endangering political and

AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File

Analysis & Opinions - The New Republic

Trump’s Foreign Policy Chaos

| Jan. 23, 2017

There is more to today’s prevailing gloom than concern about routine acts of terror. There is also a sense of strategic disorientation: After nearly three quarters of a century, the foundations of the liberal world order are giving way. In Europe, tepid growth, demographic decline, Russian revanchism and resurgent populism are testing the durability of Western cohesion.