International Relations

350 Items

Analysis & Opinions - Dallas Morning News

Trump just might be giving us the opportunity to make NAFTA even stronger

| June 07, 2017

A silver lining to all this uproar is possible. NAFTA was never perfect, but neither its game-changing benefits nor its imperfections were ever treated sensibly in public debate. Now, President Trump's intense focus on NAFTA and the willingness of his administration to renegotiate it furnishes an extraordinary opportunity to rebrand North American trade, commerce and security while addressing the issues that were either too hot to handle in the 1990s or didn't even exist then.

President Donald Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, signs an Executive Order on the Establishment of Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy at The AMES Companies, Inc., in Harrisburg, Pa., Saturday, April, 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Inconvenient Truths About the US Trade Deficit

| Apr. 25, 2017

"It is easy to blame the large trade deficit on foreign governments that block the sale of US products in their markets, which hurts American businesses and lowers their employees’ standard of living. It’s also easy to blame foreign governments that subsidize their exports to the US, which hurts the businesses and employees that lose sales to foreign suppliers (though US households as a whole benefit when foreign governments subsidize what American consumers buy)."

Brexit

DOTTEDYETI/FOTOLIA

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

The EU-UK divorce begins

| Mar. 28, 2017

Forty-four years after the United Kingdom entered into an often tempestuous but not always loveless union with Europe, Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger formal divorce proceedings Wednesday.

At the heart of the British position in these complex negotiations is a simple trade-off between sovereignty and prosperity.

From right, Cathay Pacific Chief Operating Officer Rupert Hogg, Chairman John Slosar, Chief Executive Ivan Chu and Finance Director Martin Murray attend a news conference as they announce the company result in Hong Kong, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific Airways has posted its first annual loss in almost a decade, blaming it on tough competition from rival airlines, slowing Chinese economic growth and a stronger currency. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

Analysis & Opinions - South China Morning Post

Why Hong Kong and Singapore must help their airlines soar

| Mar. 21, 2017

Derwin Pereira says no laissez-faire principles can be prized more than the symbolic importance of Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines to each territory. Both are premium Asian airlines. Both are under pressure from upstarts in other parts of Asia and even in their own regional backyards. And both need their governments to accord them the courtesy given to national institutions.

A boy flies a Saltire over the Palace of Westminster

New Statesman

Analysis & Opinions - New Statesman

Why sentiment, not statistics, will sway the next Scottish referendum

| Mar. 17, 2017

This week, we discovered that Nicola Sturgeon’s answer to new divisions, grievances and borders is . . . more divisions, grievances and borders. Since the vote on 23 June last year, it has become fashionable for some on the “liberal left” south of the border to cope with their Brexit grief by supporting, for Scotland, more nationalism as the answer to nationalism. According to this perspective, the rise of nationalism across Europe is negative, except on this island.

Michael Anton before Trump news conference

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

How Not to Fix the Liberal World Order

| Mar. 06, 2017

"Like the president he now serves, Anton doesn't understand how the global trading order actually works. Trade agreements are long and complicated today because they are no longer primarily concerned with reducing tariffs (which are already quite low). Instead, contemporary trade agreements are mostly about harmonizing labor, regulatory, environmental, and copyright standards across many different societies, precisely for the purpose of creating fairer competition between states. Agreements of this kind are very much in America's interest, because otherwise U.S. workers would have to compete with foreign industries where labor and environmental standards are much lower than they are in the United States."

A currency trader calculates Malaysian ringgit notes at a currency exchange store in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

(AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

Addicted to Dollars

| Mar. 02, 2017

Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.