International Relations

468 Items

Nicholas Burns on Greater Boston

WGBH.com

Analysis & Opinions - WGBH

Ambassador Burns on Trump’s UN Debut - WGBH "Greater Boston"

| Sep. 20, 2017

It was the debut speech heard around the world – Donald Trump at the United Nations, putting American First and other nations on notice. Over the course of 41 minutes, the president criticized the Iran nuclear deal, promised to “totally destroy” North Korea if its leader Kim Jong-Un – otherwise known as “Rocketman” – continues his path and vowed to crush the “loser terrorists” in the Middle East.

 

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

AP Photo/Richard Drew

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Most Surprising Thing About Trump’s U.N. Speech

| Sep. 19, 2017

When you discount the rhetorical overkill, the most surprising thing about President Trump’s address to the United Nations on Tuesday was how conventional it was. He supported human rights and democracy; he opposed rogue regimes; he espoused a global community of strong, sovereign nations. Pretty shocking stuff.

Cars line up at at a gas station in Pyongyang, North Korea

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Donald Trump Is Defining Successful Foreign Policy Down

| Aug. 08, 2017

"...[I]t remains to be seen if all of the signatories will even deliver on their pledge to cut off roughly $1 billion worth of North Korean trade. It is one thing to sign a resolution but quite another to halt valuable trade ties or crack down on illicit smuggling networks and other clandestine deals. Sanctions efforts are always somewhat porous, and my bet is that North Korea will find ways to get around some of these restrictions while some of signatories conveniently look the other way."

Video - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ban Ki-moon on Office Hours

| Aug. 01, 2017

Ban Ki-moon, the 8th Secretary-General of the United Nations (2007–2016), takes a moment to talk with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, how to become UN Secretary-General, and his favorite meals in New England.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ban Ki-moon on Office Hours

| Aug. 01, 2017

Ban Ki-moon, the 8th Secretary-General of the United Nations (2007–2016), takes a moment to talk with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, how to become UN Secretary-General, and his favorite meals in New England.

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook discusses the G20 on ARD

ARD.de

Analysis & Opinions - ARD Online

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook discusses the mechanism and format of the G-20 on ARD (in German)

| July 06, 2017

Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook, Founding Executive Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project discusses the mechanism and format of the G-20 in relation to UN multilateral diplomacy and the geopolitical priorities ahead of the Hamburg summit.

Angel of Independence monument, lit up in green in Mexico City

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

Why Trump Pulled the U.S. Out of the Paris Accord

| June 05, 2017

"...Trump's decision to withdraw the nation from the Paris climate agreement was not based on science or sound economics, but on a confused, misguided, and simply dishonest desire to score some short-term political points with his voters. What he sacrifices in the long term will be immensely more difficult for the country to win back at the ballot box: authority, credibility, and influence."

 Coal-fired Plant Scherer

AP

Analysis & Opinions - WGBH News

Goodbye Paris, Hello Nicaragua: Why Trump's Withdrawl From The Climate Accord Is Bad For America

| June 02, 2017

"Trump's decision is a remarkable rebuke to heads of state around the world, as well as corporate leaders in the United States, and some key senior officials within his own administration. The idea, as the president mentioned, is to save jobs, but removing ourselves from this hard-won climate agreement will have no meaningful impact on employment. Those much talked about coal jobs are not coming back."

Journal Article - Science and Engineering Ethics

On Effectiveness and Legitimacy of 'Shaming' as a Strategy for Combatting Climate Change

| Forthcoming

While states have agreed to substantial reduction of emissions in the Paris Agreement, the success of the Agreement strongly depends on the cooperation of large Multinational Corporations. Short of legal obligations, the authors discuss the effectiveness and moral legitimacy of voluntary approaches based on naming and shaming. They argue that effectiveness and legitimacy are closely tied together; as voluntary approaches are the only alternative to legally imposed duties, they are most morally defensible particularly if they would be the most effective in reducing the harmful greenhouse gases