International Security & Defense

5138 Items

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

AP/Wong Maye-E

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence

    Authors:
  • Keir A. Lieber
  • Daryl Press
| Spring 2017

For decades, nuclear deterrence has depended on the impossibility of a first strike destroying a country’s nuclear arsenal. Technological advances, however, are undermining states’ abilities to hide and protect their nuclear arsenals. These developments help explain why nuclear-armed states have continued to engage in security competition: nuclear deterrence is neither automatic nor permanent. Thus, the United States should enhance its counterforce capabilities and avoid reducing its nuclear arsenal.

Donald Trump and Jared Kushner in Oval Office

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Trump Has Learned a Lot. But He's Neglecting a Huge Part of American Leadership.

| Apr. 25, 2017

"The system the United States created has been called a liberal international order, because openness produces public goods available to all. But the label is confusing because it covers political-military affairs, economic relations, ecological relations and even promotion of liberal values. It remains to be seen to what degree these different aspects depend on each other and what the result will be if Trump unpacks the post-1945 package."

Juliette Kayyem with Dean Douglas Elmendorf before a JFK Jr. Forum on President Trump’s executive orders on immigration. (Benn Craig)

Benn Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Homeland Security Project Focuses on Immigration and Borders, Threats and Resiliency

Under the leadership of the Belfer Center's Juliette Kayyem, the Homeland Security Project will focus on the challenges in protecting the U.S.

teaser image

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Q&A: Immigration and Terrorism

| Spring 2017

In response to the Trump administration’s rollout of aggressive policies on immigration and travel, Farah Pandith and Ayaan Hirsi Ali­—both senior fellows with the Belfer Center’s Future of Diplomacy Project—have shared their contrasting views in media interviews.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with the U.S. Representative to the Vienna Office of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency Ambassador Laura Holgate on July 22, 2016, after arriving at Vienna International Airport in Vienna, Austria, to attend a meeting aimed at amending the Montreal Protocol climate change agreement. (Dept. of State)

Department of State

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Spotlight: Laura Holgate

| Spring 2017

Laura Holgate has played a major role in implementing global nuclear security measures. A Belfer Center alumna, she has just returned to the Belfer Center as a senior fellow following a number of years in the highest levels of government service.

Calder Walton is a postdoctoral Ernest May Fellow in History and Policy at the Belfer Center's International Security Program. (Bennett Craig)

Bennett Craig

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Calder Walton: History Is More Interesting Than “007”

    Author:
  • Josh Coe
| Spring 2017

An expert in intelligence history and implications for intelligence communities and policymakers today, Walton has written several articles that connect his research with recent headlines on Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. 

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Looking at Insurgent Groups and How They Use International Diplomacy to Gain Support

| Spring 2017

Morgan Kaplan, a research fellow with the Belfer Center’s International Security Program, researches the international politics of rebellion with a focus on how insurgent groups use international diplomacy to solicit third-party support.