International Security & Defense

49 Items

Wearing traditional Kazakh costumes on the shoulders, from left, U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins and Russia's cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazansky attend a press conference in Karaganda, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, shortly after their landing aboard Soyuz TMA-10M capsule. Hopkins together with the two Russia's cosmonauts landed safely in the Kazakh steppe aboard a Russian Soyuz capsule after a stay of over five months aboard the International Space Station. (AP Photo/Vasily Maximov, pool)

AP Photo/Vasily Maximov, pool

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

US-Russian space cooperation: a model for nuclear security

| Mar. 07, 2017

This interdependence between the US and Russian space programs persists even though the two countries are now living through what some pundits describe as a new Cold War. There was a time not so long ago, however, when the two nations viewed space solely as an area of strategic competition. The steps that Washington and Moscow took to transform their space rivalry into cooperation can serve today as a model for working together to help prevent nuclear terrorism, no matter how strained relations may seem.

Welcome Home, Scott Kelly. Now Let’s Go to Mars

commons.wikimedia.org

Analysis & Opinions - WIRED

Welcome Home, Scott Kelly. Now Let’s Go to Mars

| March, 4, 2016

ON TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016, Commander Scott Kelly returned home from the International Space Station after twelve months working off the Earth, for the Earth. His year in space will pay scientific and medical dividends for years to come, helping pave the way for future astronauts to travel to Mars and beyond.

Announcement - Managing the Atom Project, Belfer Center

2016-2017 Harvard Nuclear Policy Fellowships

| December 15, 2015

The Project on Managing the Atom offers fellowships for pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and mid-career researchers for one year, with a possibility for renewal, in the stimulating environment of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School. The online application for 2016-2017 fellowships opened December 15, 2015, and the application deadline is January 15, 2016. Recommendation letters are due by February 1, 2016.

James N. Miller, former under secretary of defense for policy, speaks at a Belfer event.

Harvard Kennedy School

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Miller: Preventing War Among the Great Powers

Spring 2015

James N. Miller, former under secretary of defense for policy, has joined the Belfer Center as a senior fellow. At the Center, Miller is leading a project on preventing war among the great powers. His objective is to develop recommendations to deal with changing dynamics of crisis management and escalation control that may arise from the deployment of increasingly advanced military capabilities, including in space and cyberspace.

Juliette Kayyem  (center) considers a question following her presentation on counterterrorism at a Belfer Center Board of Directors lunction on counteh.

Belfer Center

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Spotlight: Juliette Kayyem

| Spring 2015

Juliette Kayyem knows how to have a 100 percent safe Olympics – don’t have an Olympics. Because perfect security is not possible, Kayyem says public officials should aim instead for perfect planning.

Missile destroyer Yueyang enters service at a naval port in Sanya in south China's Hainan Province on Friday, May 3, 2013.

Li Zhanglong/CCPHO

Policy Brief - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Quarterly Journal: International Security

Time to Worry about China's Military Rise

    Author:
  • Evan Braden Montgomery
| June 2014

For the first time in more than two decades, the United States faces a competitor that has the ability to inflict heavy costs on its air and naval forces. Maintaining stability in East Asia will therefore require significant changes in U.S. military capabilities and posture—changes that are likely to prove difficult while defense resources are scarce. Many of these changes will take years to implement, however, and China's military modernization shows no signs of slowing. The United States cannot afford to delay.

Chinese soldiers salute during a ceremony in Hangzhou city, east Chinas Zhejiang province, November 15, 2013.

Guo Guangjie/ Imaginechina

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Contested Primacy in the Western Pacific: China's Rise and the Future of U.S. Power Projection

    Author:
  • Evan Braden Montgomery
| Spring 2014

Despite their disagreements, proponents of deep engagement and offshore balancing share an optimistic but unrealistic assessment regarding the durability of U.S. military dominance. China’s antiaccess/area denial strategy and conventional precision-strike capabilities are already undermining the United States’ military dominance in East Asia. The United States will need to adapt its military to meet this challenge.

Presentation - Managing the Atom Project, Belfer Center

The China-India Space Race: Rhetoric or Reality?

| March 3, 2014

The space exploration agendas of China and India have progressed rapidly in the last decade, spanning from human spaceflight to missions to the Moon and Mars.  Their growing economies have made it possible to fund these programs at a level unconceivable before now. This has therefore stimulated the scientific communities in both states to be more ambitious. In this presentation to the Harvard University South Asia Institute, MTA/ISP Fellow Jaganath Sankaran explores the intracacies of this delicate relationship.