Science & Technology

1115 Items

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- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

International Security

| Summer 2017

A sampling of articles in the Spring 2016 issue of the Belfer Center's journal International Security.

International Security is America’s leading journal of security affairs. 
IS was ranked first in impact factor for 2014 among 85 journals of international relations in the annual “Journal Citation Reports”® released by Thomson Reuters. International Security’s 2014 Impact Factor is the highest of any international relations journals.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A Lifelong Champion for “Inclusive Innovation”

| Summer 2017

As director of the Belfer Center’s Science, Technology, and Globalization Project, Calestous Juma works to better leverage scientific and technological knowledge for poor and vulnerable communities around the world. 

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Developing S&T Research in the Gulf States

A Belfer Center science and technology team traveled to Kuwait in March to take part in a collaborative workshop with the Kuwait Foundation for Advancement of Science (KFAS) on “Science and Technology in the GCC: Building Research Capacity and Vital Linkages.”

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Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

What Happens When Your Car Gets Hacked?

| May 19, 2017

Bruce Schneier advocates for stricter government regulation to improve security on "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices.  Without that, he argues, we are going to see hackers attacking our cars, digital video recorders, web cameras, refrigerators, and so much more as our dependency on IoT devices grows.  

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, meet at an hotel in Vienna, July 9, 2015

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Scientific American

How International Cooperation in Research Advances Both Science and Diplomacy

| Apr. 27, 2017

"The partial budget blueprint released by the White House recently will put U.S. leadership in science and technology at serious risk if Congress goes along. In addition to the obvious damage that would result from the proposed $5.8 billion cut at NIH, the $2 billion cut in applied energy R&D, the $900 million cut in DOE’s Office of Science, the abolition of ARPA-E, and the research cuts at NOAA and EPA, a less immediately obvious potential casualty would be U.S. scientific cooperation with a wide variety of other countries on a wide variety of topics."

Science March Washington D.C.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

Science's Role in Society is Threatened. Protest is the Right Response

| Apr. 22, 2017

"In recent years we’ve seen an increasing number of influential politicians reject well-established science on climate change, evolution, vaccines, gun violence. The value of government investments in research (particularly basic research) is being called into question — as is whether leaders of government need advice from scientists at all. These attitudes have been most evident in the first 100 days of the Trump administration."

March for Science and Banner in Washington, D.C.

AP

News - American Association for the Advancement of Science

Holdren Outlines Ways to 'Restore Science to Its Rightful Place'

    Author:
  • Anne Q. Hoy
| Apr. 21, 2017

"The scientific community needs to more effectively speak out about the necessity of evidence-based policies, scientific integrity protections and public access to research to defend the role of science, said John Holdren, former White House science adviser, in a speech on the eve of the April 22nd March for Science."

U.S. Capitol

Kevin McCoy CC

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Some Thoughts on the Scientists' March

| Apr. 19, 2017

Understandable concerns have been expressed by some in the scientific community that marching on April 22 will make scientists look like "just another interest group" or "just worried about their jobs" or that they will be seen as "politicizing science." After considerable reflection and discussion with a number of science-community leaders, John P. Holdren, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at Harvard University has reached the following conclusions about this issue. 

Book - Gerlach Press

Science and Technology Development in the Gulf States: Economic Diversification through Regional Collaboration

This book provides an in-depth discussion of what is needed to accelerate the development of science, technology and innovation in the Gulf. Among other issues, the authors discuss the need for regional collaboration, and tackle systemic challenges such as immigration policies, career incentives for GCC citizens, and increased inclusion of women in the workforce.