The extraction of natural resources in the Amazon only continues to increase, resulting in a record number of land-related conflicts, deforestation, and murders of environmental defenders, disproportionately affecting indigenous and peasant populations. At the same time, scientists continue to warn of the potential collapse of Amazon ecosystem, which would have catastrophic global impacts. What futures are in dispute in the Amazon? How can an interrelated, interdependent, and sustainable collective future for the rainforest and future generations of humans and non-humans emerge?

Speakers: 
Tônkyré Akrãtikatêjê (Katia Silene Valdenilson), first female leader of the Gavião Akrãtikatêjê ethnic group and Visiting Researcher at the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA)
Marcelo Furtado, Lemann Visiting Public Policy Fellow, ILAS-Columbia (Fall 2021)
Felipe Milanez, Professor at the Institute of Humanities, Arts and Sciences, Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), and Visiting Scholar at the Clark Center for the Study of Natural Resource Extraction and Society, Clark University (Fall 2021)

Moderated by: 
Marcia Castro, Andelot Professor of Demography; Chair, Department of Global Health and Population, HSPH; Chair, Brazil Studies Program

Co-Sponsors and Collaborators: 
Clark Center for the Study of Natural Resource Extraction and Society
Columbia Global Centers, Rio de Janeiro
Environment and Natural Resources Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE)
Harvard University Native American Program
Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS), Columbia University