14 Past Events

For the purposes of this discussion, we are referring to IP broadly defined: proprietary algorithms, data collected, a complete developed product, etc.

CC: pxhere

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: What is the right approach for sharing intellectual property around emerging technology?  

Tue., Mar. 26, 2019 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its third session of the spring semester. This session will explore the limits and advantages of intellectual property (IP) sharing for emerging technologies. For the purposes of this discussion, we are referring to IP broadly defined: proprietary algorithms, data collected, a complete developed product, etc. This brief focuses on tech companies, research centers, and labs that decide to limit access to certain types of  IP in the name of protecting overall public good—using artificial intelligence algorithms as a primary example—but we expect discussion to encompass other technologies as well. This session will also examine the implications of alleged Chinese theft of emerging tech IP. 

The 116th Congress faces pressure to consider policy approaches to the dilemmas of big tech platforms.

CC: Lucas (flickr)

Special Series - Open to the Public

Big Tech and Democracy: Policy Approaches to Address Tech Platforms

Thu., Mar. 21, 2019 | 9:30am - 2:30pm

Technology has reached a critical juncture in American society. The unfettered optimism of recent decades is now tempered through rising concerns over privacy and security, the impact of disinformation campaigns, and increasing calls for digital accountability. It is clear that the 116th Congress will face pressure to shape technological innovation through policies that protect and serve the best interests of their constituents.

The Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center together with the Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project at HKS’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs is hosting a workshop on Capitol Hill for Congressional staffers focused on identifying and discussing policy approaches to the dilemmas of big tech platforms.

A sustainable and peaceful future will depend on whether the next generation of innovators are able to anticipate and mitigate the challenges these technologies will bring.

stock.adobe.com

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: Does Venture Capital Have a Public Purpose Responsibility for Tech Startups?

Tue., Feb. 19, 2019 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its second session of the spring semester. This session will explore private sector investment in emerging technologies and the impact investing practices have on the development of these technologies.  

Many emerging and disruptive technologies enter the market as start-up companies backed by venture capital (VC) firms. These technologies often deliver better and more affordable products to consumers, and provide improvements to critical public goods such as a free press, public transportation, and housing. However, new technologies also often result in the unintended and/or unanticipated disruption of critical public services, as well as undesirable applications of services by users. Today a new generation of start-ups are building the next round of disruptive technologies and services. These include blockchain, genome editing, quantum computing, space-based technologies, advanced AI, IoT, and neurotechnologies—just to name a few; all of which have enormous market potential, but will also have transformational impacts on society. 

A sustainable and peaceful future will depend on whether the next generation of innovators are able to anticipate and mitigate the challenges these technologies will bring, and this session will examine how VCs fit into this landscape. 

The west side of the U.S. Capitol building.

CC: Martin Falbisoner

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

TAPP and GAO Lunch Discussion Session: Generating Effective Technology Assessment for Congress

Mon., Feb. 4, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Taubman Building - Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has been tasked by Congress to develop a new, expanded body within GAO to generate technology assessments for Congress, provide on-demand technical assistance to the Congress, provide oversight of federal S&T programs, and develop innovative analytical techniques in carrying out audits and evaluations. GAO has a forthcoming report to Congress this spring that will detail their research into best practices for this S&T assessment work and how they plan to structure this new body within GAO focused on S&T issues.

The Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project is hosting a lunch discussion with GAO’s Chief Scientist and fellow members of the GAO S&T leadership team to help them examine how to make technology assessment and S&T advice for Congress most effective and policy-relevant.

The Capitol dome.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: How Could Reinstating the Office of Technology Assessment or Other Mechanisms Help Congress Effectively Respond to Emerging Technologies?

Tue., Jan. 29, 2019 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its first session of the spring semester on the topic of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) or other mechanisms to help Congress effectively respond to emerging technologies. This session will examine Congressional science and technology (S&T) capacity needs and how these needs are shaped by the current, rapidly evolving emerging technology landscape. This session will also explore the S&T-relevant resources that currently exist for Congress, and how the past work of OTA and similar efforts might be adopted to strengthen Congressional decision-making today. 

Dr. I.P. Park, LG Electronics president and CTO, ushers in the future of Artificial Intelligence while delivering the LG Pre CES keynote address.

Jack Dempsey/AP Images for LG Electronics

Seminar - Open to the Public

Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future

Wed., Jan. 23, 2019 | 9:30am - 11:30am

Taubman Building - Nye A, B, & C, 5th Floor

Join us for a discussion on “Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future” with Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab and a panel of distinguished speakers working on innovative and emerging AI-based technologies. This event is sponsored by the Harvard Belfer Center's Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project
 

In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, Zhou Xiaoqin, left, loads Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA molecules into a fine glass pipette as Qin Jinzhou watches at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province.

(AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Seminar - Open to the Public

Altering the Human Genome: What Do China’s Gene Edited Babies Mean for Humanity?

Tue., Dec. 11, 2018 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Belfer Building - Bell Hall, 5th Floor

The Technology and Public Purpose (TAPP) Project will host a lunch panel discussion on recent developments concerning CRISPR technology and genetic embryo editing, from 12:00-1:30pm in Bell Hall (B-500). 

Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis. Please RSVP here.

Major advancements in the remote sensing field have been enabled by other recent emerging technologies. 

CC: Wikipedia

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: Remote Sensing

Tue., Nov. 27, 2018 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its fourth and final fall session on the topic of remote sensing. This session will examine current applications of remote sensing, the evolution of the industry due to other technological advancements in fields like quantum computing and machine learning, and how to continue to safeguard against potential security and privacy risks.

 Much of the science that underpins quantum computing is still being discovered.

Erik Lucero/Google

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: Quantum Computing

Tue., Oct. 30, 2018 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its third fall session on the topic of quantum computing. This session will examine where quantum computing stands today, the different sectors involved in the advancement of quantum computing, its potential practical applications in the future, and how to safeguard against potential security risks posed by quantum computing—especially, cryptography. 

Cloudy skies during an International Space Station flyover on Oct. 22, 2017.

ESA/NASA

Special Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group: Solar Geoengineering

Tue., Oct. 16, 2018 | 8:00am - 9:30am

Littauer Building - Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor

The Boston Tech Hub Faculty Working Group, hosted by former Secretary of Defense and Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Director Ash Carter and Harvard SEAS Dean Frank Doyle, will convene its second fall session on the topic of solar geoengineering and the question of whether serious research efforts should be undertaken around the world. This session will discuss current knowledge about solar geoengineering and explore how a more vigorous research effort might reduce uncertainties.