100 Past Events

Conference - Open to the Public

Women in Power Conference 2019

Fri., Apr. 12, 2019 - Sat., Apr. 13, 2019

Harvard Kennedy School

The Women in Power Conference will provide an outlet for students and professionals to explore, discuss, and debate important issues relating to the advancement of women in leadership by facilitating a thoughtful dialogue between the Harvard Kennedy School community and top thought leaders and practitioners.

The topic of creating a pipeline for women to secure well-earned leadership positions has never been more relevant. Our conference theme, “Women in Power: Rise. Challenge. Thrive.”, will focus on uniting diverse perspectives and experiences relating to women in leadership positions. The conference will emphasize the need for an inclusive and productive dialogue, opening the conversation to women with diverse personal and professional experiences as well as allies that advocate for women in leadership. This constant discussion resonates not only in our classrooms, but also in local, national, and global politics and lives at the heart of policy issues in the workplace.

For tickets, visit: https://www.womeninpowerconference.org/

Ms. Lindiwe Mazibuko

Whacked Agency

Study Group - Open to the Public

Study Group #2 of 2: Africa’s Democratic Future in a Trump & Brexit World

Wed., Apr. 10, 2019 | 4:15pm - 5:45pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

This is Part Two of a two-part study group series. Led by Lindiwe Mazibuko, Fisher Family Fellow with the Future of Diplomacy Project and first black woman in South African history to be elected Leader of the Opposition in Parliament. Both sessions will be on the political risks and realities for Africa of a world with an increasingly isolated Global North.

RSVP is required. Light snacks and refreshments will be provided.

Ms. Lindiwe Mazibuko

Whacked Agency

Study Group - Open to the Public

Study Group #1 of 2: Africa’s Democratic Future in a Trump & Brexit World

Mon., Apr. 8, 2019 | 4:15pm - 5:45pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

This is Part One of a two-part study group series. Led by Lindiwe Mazibuko, Fisher Family Fellow with the Future of Diplomacy Project and first black woman in South African history to be elected Leader of the Opposition in Parliament. Both sessions will be on the political risks and realities for Africa of a world with an increasingly isolated Global North.

RSVP is required. Light snacks and refreshments will be provided.

 The Democratic Alliance's poster for the 2011 municipal elections in South Africa.

Democratic Alliance / Flickr

Seminar - Open to the Public

“'We Don’t Need Another Hero': The Future of Public Leadership in Africa” with Lindiwe Mazibuko

Wed., Apr. 3, 2019 | 12:15pm - 1:45pm

Belfer Building - Bell Hall, 5th Floor

Please join the Future of Diplomacy Project in a discussion with Fisher Family Fellow, Lindiwe Mazibuko, moderated by Professor Nicholas Burns exploring why smart, entrepreneurial, highly-skilled, and service-oriented young Africans should avail themselves for political leadership and government appointment to drive and support Africa’s socio-economic prosperity. 

Lunch will be served.

Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield

US Department of State

Seminar - Open to the Public

Africa: A Continent of Vast Opportunity

Thu., Mar. 7, 2019 | 12:15pm - 1:45pm

Belfer Building - Bell Hall, 5th Floor

Africa is a continent of vast opportunity and promise while at the same time faces some of the most difficult challenges of our time from poverty to terrorism and everything in between. It is resource rich but has some of the poorest countries in the world. Join Professor Nicholas Burns and Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield, former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs at the US State Department, for a discussion on how Africa's future will impact all of us and why it must be a priority for US policymakers.

Lunch will be served.

Al-Shabab communal prayers and public celebrations marking the Eid al-Adha holiday in the Islamic lunar year of 1438 in the Galguduud region of central Somalia in June 2017.

Open Source

Seminar - Open to the Public

Islamizing Rebel Governance: Jihadi Insurgencies and Symbolic Power

Thu., Feb. 21, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Christopher Anzalone, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program

The advent of Islamist rebel governing projects in different regions of the world from Africa to the Middle East and West and South Asia provides an opportunity to link the empirical study of these groups with the broader academic literature on rebel governance, political Islam, and religion and violence. Despite in recent years making up a larger number of empirical cases of insurgent organizations seeking to implement governance projects, Islamist organizations have to date received limited focus in studies on the structures, ideologies, and dynamics of rebel governance. This interdisciplinary project examines the strategies and experiences of Islamist insurgent organizations that have actively attempted to set up civil governing systems through which to interact with local civilian populations. It situates the study of Islamist insurgent groups with governance ambitions within the growing literature on rebel governance.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Oxfam distributing water in the Horn of Africa during a severe drought, 24 February 2011.

Wikimedia CC/Oxfam

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Nexus between Internationalism and Localism in Civil Conflict: Insurgents' Policy toward Humanitarian Access

Thu., Jan. 31, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Ayako Kobayashi, Research Fellow, International Security Program

Why do some rebel groups restrict international humanitarian access to areas under their control, while others allow it? Some scholars posit that rebels strategically comply with international humanitarian law to legitimize their status in the international arena. Others underline the importance of exploring interactions between non-state armed groups and local populations from which protection norms may emerge. This interdisciplinary project will fill the gap between the internationalism and localism by proposing a new typology of rebel groups, addressing conditions under which rebels are more likely to allow humanitarian access, and through case studies illustrating the theory.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Mutiny in Cote d'Ivoire in January 2017

Ultima Ratio

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Wartime Roots of Military Obedience and Defiance in Insurgent-Ruled States

Thu., Dec. 13, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Philip Andrew Martin, Research Fellow, International Security Program

Why do some winning armed movements build states with robust control over military forces after civil war, while others do not? Why, for example, did the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) and the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) succeed in building powerful and obedient post-war armies, while winning coalitions in Côte d'Ivoire (2011—), Libya (2011—), and Afghanistan (2001—) experienced military fragmentation and the growth of private armed networks controlled by ex-rebel commanders? While existing scholarship points to the role of ideology and external intervention, this book project argues that two wartime factors — threats to the survival of armed movements, and the social linkages between militant group commanders and insurgent-ruled communities — shape the bargaining power and behavior of ex-rebel commanders during transitions to postwar politics.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

The Eighth Secretary-General of the United Nations, Mr. Ban Ki-moon

United Nations

Study Group - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Study Group with Mr. Ban Ki-moon on "The United Nations and Global Citizenship"

Thu., Oct. 25, 2018 | 4:15pm - 5:45pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Led by the eighth Secretary-General of the United Nations, Mr. Ban Ki-moon, this study group will focus on the role of the United Nations and global citizenship in resolving today's most challenging issues. The study group will also discuss how we can pursue sustainable development in corners of the globe by engaging collaboratively with the field, communities, and diverse expertise. Snacks and coffee / tea will be provided.

Since there is limited capacity, please note that spots will be based on your application. Please use the link above to RSVP.