232 Past Events

Ambassador Romana Vlahutin

European External Action Service

Seminar - Open to the Public

How the EU Connects: New Connectivity Strategy with Ambassador Vlahutin

Thu., Apr. 18, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:10pm

Taubman Building - Nye A, 5th Floor

Please join the Project on Europe for a discussion on the EU's new connectivity strategy with Ambassador Romana Vlahutin, Representative for Connectivity in the European External Action Service, moderated by Philippe Le Corre, affiliate with the Project on Europe and senior fellow with the Mossavar-Rahmani Center on Business and Government.

Lunch will be served.

Conference - Open to the Public

Women in Power Conference 2019

Fri., Apr. 12, 2019 - Sat., Apr. 13, 2019

Harvard Kennedy School

The Women in Power Conference will provide an outlet for students and professionals to explore, discuss, and debate important issues relating to the advancement of women in leadership by facilitating a thoughtful dialogue between the Harvard Kennedy School community and top thought leaders and practitioners.

The topic of creating a pipeline for women to secure well-earned leadership positions has never been more relevant. Our conference theme, “Women in Power: Rise. Challenge. Thrive.”, will focus on uniting diverse perspectives and experiences relating to women in leadership positions. The conference will emphasize the need for an inclusive and productive dialogue, opening the conversation to women with diverse personal and professional experiences as well as allies that advocate for women in leadership. This constant discussion resonates not only in our classrooms, but also in local, national, and global politics and lives at the heart of policy issues in the workplace.

For tickets, visit: https://www.womeninpowerconference.org/

French President Macron (L) and Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) shake hands during a press conference in Beijing, China, January 9, 2018.

Reuters

Seminar - Open to the Public

France: A Key Player in Europe’s Relationship with China

Wed., Apr. 3, 2019 | 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Center for European Studies

As the first European nation having established diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of China in 1964, France has always had a special link with Beijing. With China now presenting itself as the next superpower, how does France position itself? Does it advocate a stand-alone approach or a pan-European strategy? As the US-China relationship becomes more confrontational, where does Emmanuel Macron’s France stand on a transatlantic dialogue vis a vis China?

Hosted by the Center for European Studies. Location: Goldman Room, Adolphus Busch Hall

The newly developed DF-26 medium-range ballistic missile as seen after the military parade held in Beijing to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII, 3 September 2015.

Wikimedia CC/IceUnshattered

Seminar - Open to the Public

Sino-U.S. Inadvertent Nuclear Escalation

Thu., Mar. 14, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: WU Riqiang, Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

It is generally believed that in peacetime current Sino-U.S. nuclear relations are stable and deliberate nuclear exchanges between these two countries are unimaginable. However, conventional conflict might escalate to nuclear level, even if both sides wish to avoid it at the beginning of the war. This seminar will provide a causal mechanism of Sino-U.S. inadvertent escalation. Three driving factors are identified: the vulnerability of Chinese nuclear forces, the not-by-design co-mingling of China's conventional and nuclear weapons, and the fog of war. The security dilemma will worsen the situation and increase the escalatory risk. The mechanism is then tested via two hypothetical scenarios: a missile campaign and submarine warfare. In order to reduce the risk of inadvertent escalation, the United States should build confidence with China by declaring mutual vulnerability vis-à-vis China and constraining its strategic capabilities. China could also demarcate its nuclear and conventional missiles and clarify its no-first-use policy that conventional attacks on nuclear weapons would be regarded as nuclear attacks.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Map of Europe in 1914. During WWI,  The United Kingdom and Germany continued to trade certain items, such as hosiery needles used in textile manufacturing.

Wikimedia CC/Varmin

Seminar - Open to the Public

Planning for the Short Haul: Trade with the Enemy During War

Thu., Mar. 7, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Mariya Grinberg, Research Fellow, International Security Program

In times of war, why do belligerents continue to trade with each other? The speaker shows that states set product level commercial policies to balance two potentially conflicting goals — maximizing state revenue from continued trade during the war and minimizing the ability of the opponent to benefit from security externalities of the trade. States are more likely to trade with the enemy in (1) products that their opponents take a long time to convert into military capability and (2) products that are essential to the domestic economy. The amount of time it takes the opponent to convert gains from trade into military capabilities determines which products are too dangerous to be traded during a war. The mitigating factor is the amount of revenue the state can extract from trade. The more essential the product is to the domestic economy, the less a state can afford to lose trade in it.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Satiric drawing from the Catalan newspaper "La Campana de Gràcia" in 1896 satirizing the USA's intentions about Cuba. Upper text (not displayed) reads (in old Catalan): "Uncle Sam's craving (by M. Moliné)." Text below (not displayed) reads: "Saving the island so it won't get lost."

"La Campana de Gràcia" in the May 23, 1896 edition

Seminar - Open to the Public

1898: "Precautionary War" and the Three Myths of American Empire

Thu., Feb. 28, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Aroop Mukharji, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

President William McKinley's foreign policy ranks among the most consequential of all U.S. presidents. At the start of his first term, the United States was primarily hemispheric in its foreign policy orientation. By the start of his second term, the United States had brought down a European colonial power, had begun governing seven new overseas territories, and had fought two additional wars in Asia.

This presentation focuses specifically on the Spanish-American War and why McKinley decided to intervene. Three myths about his motivations continue to persist: (1) that the United States waged an economically imperialist war to open up trade opportunities, (2) that the rhetoric of manliness pressured McKinley into taking a more aggressive stance, and (3) that the yellow press whipped up a public frenzy that led to the declaration of war. These influences are greatly overstated. Instead, this presentation will argue that the Spanish-American War was partly a humanitarian war, but also a "precautionary war" (author's term) that was based on a general fear of disorder, uncertainty, and instability and waged to ensure conditions that better facilitated regional stability and peace.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Satellite image of the half-built light water reactor site in North Korea.

Google Earth Image@2018 DigitalGlobe

Seminar - Open to the Public

Normalization by Other Means — The Failed Techno-diplomacy of Light Water Reactor Export in the North Korean Nuclear Crisis

Thu., Feb. 14, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Christopher Lawrence, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

The history of U.S. engagement with North Korea offers important lessons that could help reframe the diplomatic impasse today. In the 1994 Agreed Framework (AF), the regime agreed to dismantle its plutonium-production complex in exchange for western light water reactors (LWR) and the promise of political normalization with the United States. As construction of the LWRs fell behind, however, North Korea embarked on a secret uranium enrichment program. Today, scholars and policymakers look back at the LWRs of the AF as a "carrot" — "we offered the carrot, and they cheated anyway." But when scholars and policymakers consider the unique technical attributes of LWRs and how their construction was planned to be situated within a diplomatic track to normalization, they appear to function more as a way to signal commitment than as a carrot to bribe the regime. In this light, chronic construction delays and the offset of LWR costs to U.S. allies can be interpreted as signals about America's lack of commitment to normalization with North Korea. This conceptual shift — from carrots and sticks to signaling and credibility — offers important insights into past diplomatic failures and could help reconcile the competing visions of engagement with North Korea today.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Memorial to the Fighters for Soviet Power in the Far East, 1917–1922, Vladivostok, Russia

Paul Behringer

Seminar - Open to the Public

Reconquering the Russian Far East: Civil War, Intervention, and Centralization

Thu., Jan. 17, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Paul Behringer, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

In 1917–1918, the Russian state collapsed and its empire disintegrated. The Bolsheviks, having seized power in November 1917, managed to hold onto authority amid repeated challenges from domestic and foreign opponents in all directions. In October 1922, Lenin's party emerged victorious from the rubble of one of the most destructive civil wars in history. Historians have put forward several convincing arguments for why the Bolsheviks were able to win the overall struggle. But the fact that the new regime was also able to reconstitute much of the Russian Empire, extending all the way to the Pacific Ocean, is as astounding today as it was unlikely in 1918. This presentation attempts to explain this accomplishment by framing the civil war in the Russian Far East as a contest between geopolitical, social, ideological, and international forces of centralization and decentralization. Building on the most recent historiographic trends in the study of the Russian Civil War, it also speaks to political science research on the broader issues of intrastate conflict, foreign intervention, and violence.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Event Poster

Korea Institute / Harvard

Seminar - Open to the Public

"Engaging North Korea: What are the Current Signposts Telling Us?"

Wed., Dec. 5, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Center for Government and International Studies - South Building

Public panel discussion with Ambassador Joseph Yun, Robert Carlin and Bonnie Glaser on "ENGAGING NORTH KOREA: WHAT ARE THE CURRENT SIGNPOSTS TELLING US?" chaired by Dr. John Park.

The Harvard Korea Working Group acknowledges the generous support of the Korea Foundation.

Robert Carlin (Visiting Scholar, Stanford University; former CIA Korea analyst)
Bonnie Glaser (Director, China Power Project, Center for Strategic & International Studies)
Ambassador Joseph Yun (Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace; former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy)
Dr. John Park, Chair (Director, Korea Project, Harvard Kennedy School)

Asia Beyond the Headlines Seminar Series, Harvard University Asia Center; co-sponsored by the Korea Project at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School & the Harvard Korea Institute’s SBS Foundation Research Fund.