816 Past Events

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Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Four Horsemen of AI–Cybered Conflict, Great Power Competition, and the Cyber Operational Resilience Alliance (CORA)

Mon., Apr. 22, 2019 | 12:15pm - 1:30pm

One Brattle Square - Suite 470

Join the Cybsercurity Project for a lunch seminar with Dr. Chris Demchak, US Naval War College’s Grace M. Hopper Chair of Cyber Security and Senior Cyber Scholar, Cyber and Innovation Policy Institute (CIPI). Dr. Demchak will discuss the "Four Horsemen of AI–Cybered Conflict, Great Power Competition, and the Cyber Operational Resilience Alliance (CORA)."  

Lunch provided on a first come, first served basis.

President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney wave from the Situation Room of the White House, March 19, 2007, as they're joined in a video teleconference by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of Iraq.

White House/Eric Draper

Seminar - Open to the Public

Too Much of a Good Thing? Civil-Military Relations in the Wake of Technological Disruption

Thu., Apr. 18, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speakers: Mathias Ormestad Frendem, Henry Chauncey Jr. '57 Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Studies and the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, Yale University; A. Bradley Potter, Research Fellow, International Security Program

What effect do emerging communications technologies have on U.S. civil-military relations? How might the history of such technological disruption help us prepare for future disruptions? Most scholarship suggests that such developments should empower civilian leaders to better monitor and oversee military leaders, bringing in line military efforts with civilian preferences. However, the speakers argue that these technologies also bring with them challenging consequences for civil-military relations. Namely, they may encourage tendencies in both parties that undermine decision-making and long-term healthy interaction. The speakers illustrate this with a case study of relations between President George W. Bush and George W. Casey prior to launching the "surge" in Iraq.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Ambassador Romana Vlahutin

European External Action Service

Seminar - Open to the Public

How the EU Connects: New Connectivity Strategy with Ambassador Vlahutin

Thu., Apr. 18, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:10pm

Taubman Building - Nye A, 5th Floor

Please join the Project on Europe for a discussion on the EU's new connectivity strategy with Ambassador Romana Vlahutin, Representative for Connectivity in the European External Action Service, moderated by Philippe Le Corre, affiliate with the Project on Europe and senior fellow with the Mossavar-Rahmani Center on Business and Government.

Lunch will be served.

event

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Disinformation Threat Watch: The Disinformation Landscape in East Asia and Implications for US Policy

Wed., Apr. 17, 2019 | 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Join the Defending Digital Democracy Project (D3P) for a seminar on recent student research. Bo Julie Crowley (MPP1), Casey Corcoran (MPP1/JD), and Raina Davis (MPP1) will present their new report, "Disinformation Threat Watch: The Disinformation Landscape in East Asia and Implications for US Policy." 

Conference - Open to the Public

Women in Power Conference 2019

Fri., Apr. 12, 2019 - Sat., Apr. 13, 2019

Harvard Kennedy School

The Women in Power Conference will provide an outlet for students and professionals to explore, discuss, and debate important issues relating to the advancement of women in leadership by facilitating a thoughtful dialogue between the Harvard Kennedy School community and top thought leaders and practitioners.

The topic of creating a pipeline for women to secure well-earned leadership positions has never been more relevant. Our conference theme, “Women in Power: Rise. Challenge. Thrive.”, will focus on uniting diverse perspectives and experiences relating to women in leadership positions. The conference will emphasize the need for an inclusive and productive dialogue, opening the conversation to women with diverse personal and professional experiences as well as allies that advocate for women in leadership. This constant discussion resonates not only in our classrooms, but also in local, national, and global politics and lives at the heart of policy issues in the workplace.

For tickets, visit: https://www.womeninpowerconference.org/

As part of MOD’s full-spectrum military capability, the Defence Secretary, Philip Hammond, has announced that the department is set to recruit hundreds of computer experts as cyber reservists to help defend the UK’s national security, working at the cutting-edge of the nation’s cyber defences.  Mr Hammond confirmed the creation of a new Joint Cyber Reserve which will see reservists working alongside regular forces to protect critical computer networks and safeguard vital data, 4 October 2013.

MoD/Chris Roberts

Seminar - Open to the Public

Cyber Securitization: Can States Deter Cyber Escalation?

Thu., Mar. 21, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Nadiya Kostyuk, Predoctoral Fellow, Cyber Security Project

This seminar examines conditions under which publicly observable "institutional change," which broadcast a state's rising or extensive cyber capabilities, can deter a country's adversaries from attacking it. The "use-and-lose" nature of cyber operations and difficulty of cyber attribution make such operations more effective in achieving tactical surprise than in deterring opponents. However, merely establishing a cyber unit and disclosing its estimated budget and personnel may increase the credibility of a state's threat and signal to multiple audiences, including its adversaries, that a country has, or is in the process of developing, its "power to hurt." 

The speaker's research demonstrates that even though the cases in which institutional change will influence a strong adversary's choice to attack are limited, states tend to sub-optimally overinvest resources in publicly observable institutional changes. Weak states overinvest to make adversaries believe they are strong whereas strong states overinvest because they do not want adversaries to believe that they are weak states, pretending to be strong. The speaker's focus on the strategic logic of institutional change as a deterrent represents a departure from existing literature, which largely examines deterrence using cyber operations and other statecraft tools.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.