1084 Events

Dr. Peter Neumann, Director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalization in the United Kingdom, addresses the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism's first session — Understanding Violent Extremism Today — at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., on February 19, 2015.

State Department/ Public Domain

Seminar - Open to the Public

Countering Violent Extremism: A Quest for Legitimacy and Effectiveness

Thu., Nov. 29, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Anina Schwarzenbach, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program

In the face of the increased number of individuals adhering to extremist ideologies in modern democratic states, governments have augmented the amount of public money spent on counter violent extremism strategies and programs. Despite this fact, systematic analyses of currently implemented strategies and programs are surprisingly sparse.

This seminar will discuss — by focusing on Germany, France, and the United States — which governmental approaches are most appropriate to counter violent extremism and what ought to be expected from the strategies and programs in terms of legitimacy and effectiveness.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Inadvertent Expansion in World Politics

Thu., Nov. 15, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Nicholas D. Anderson, Research Fellow, International Security Program

Most existing theories of expansion and territorial conquest tend to focus on key actors at the center of great states and empires, and on their will and ability to engage in expansion. However, a number of important instances of territorial expansion in the history of great power politics do not align well with these theories, showing territorial expansion to be far more peripherally-driven and far less intentional than they would expect. Drawing on research on the British and Japanese Empires, as well as on America's westward expansion, this presentation will outline a theory of inadvertent expansion that helps account for these puzzling and counter-intuitive cases.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Illiberal Disruption: Temporary Detour or Historical Turning Point?

Wed., Nov. 14, 2018 | 5:00pm - 6:30pm

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Speaker: Charles Kupchan, Professor of International Affairs, School of Foreign Service and Government Department, Georgetown University; Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations

Grand Strategy, Security, and Statecraft Speaker Series, co-sponsored with MIT's Security Studies Program

Location: MIT Building 66, Room 110

Everyone is welcome! Please join us!

Seminar - Open to the Public

Jihadism Constrained: The Limits of Transnational Jihadism and What It Means for Counterterrorism

Thu., Nov. 8, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Barak Mendelsohn, Associate Professor of Political Science, Haverford College

The seminar focuses on three factors — material, ideational, and intra-movement — that limit the ability of transnational jihadi groups to attain their objectives. These limitations should inform a less interventionist and more cost-effective strategy of containment.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

National Security Institutions and Interstate Crisis

Thu., Nov. 1, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Tyler Jost, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program/Cyber Security Project

Why do interstate crises occur? Existing scholarship posits that states use crises to reveal information about capabilities, resolve, and preferences. This book project instead argues that interstate crisis propensity is in part a function of the design of national security institutions, defined as the rules and procedures for deciding and executing national security strategy.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Artificial Intelligence: The Profits and Perils for Military Operations and Decision Making

Thu., Oct. 25, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Lt. Col. Wes Adams, Research Fellow, International Security Program

In his research, Lt. Col. Adams investigates the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the future of military decision making. Since the dawn of recorded warfare, battlefield commanders sought greater speed and insight over their enemy, trying to reduce what Clausewitz would famously declare the "fog and friction" of war. Over time, myriad technologies offered promises of battlefield omniscience but failed. Will AI be the final technology to deliver on the promise, or the next failed attempt at clearing the fog?

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict

Thu., Oct. 18, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Jacob N. Shapiro, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University; Co-author, Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict

How a new understanding of warfare can help manage today's conflicts more effectively. Small Wars, Big Data provides groundbreaking perspectives for how small wars can be better strategized and favorably won to the benefit of the local population.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.