1048 Events

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Seminar - Open to the Public

The Past, Present, and Future Development of International Safeguards for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

Wed., Apr. 11, 2018 | 10:00am - 11:30am

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Mark Walker, Ph.D. Candidate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

This seminar presents the results of archival research undertaken in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany into the origins of international safeguards approaches for gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). Archival documents indicate that multilateral discourse on GCEP safeguards was dominated in the 1970s and early 1980s by political disagreements over a number of safeguards issues, including inspector effort, inspector access, and the role of the IAEA in verifying undeclared nuclear material and activities. While the gridlock that ensued over these questions necessitated the creation of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP), a technical forum in which technology holders and inspectorates were to agree once and for all on an approach for safeguards at GCEPs, some contentious HSP issues (including the question of cascade access) were still largely resolved through political compromise. Following a discussion of the factors that led to the 1983 HSP safeguards approach, the legacy of the HSP approach on the state of play of modern GCEP safeguards will be discussed, along with paths forward for ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of GCEP safeguards in coming years.

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

Solving the Jurisdictional Conundrum: The Use of Domestic Civil Courts to Disrupt Overseas Illicit Procurement

Wed., Apr. 4, 2018 | 10:00am - 11:30am

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Aaron Arnold, Associate Project on Managing the Atom; Assistant Professor at Curry College

Over the past two decades, the United States has increasingly turned to targeted sanctions and export restrictions, such as those imposed against Iran and North Korea, in order to curb the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). One vexing problem, however, is how to contend with jurisdictional hurdles when the violations occur overseas, in countries that are unable or unwilling to assist US enforcement efforts. To solve this problem, US prosecutors are turning to strategies with significant extraterritorial implications— that is, exercising legal authority beyond national borders. One such tool is to use civil legal procedures to seize assets linked to sanctions or export control violations in jurisdictions that lack cooperative arrangement with US enforcement agencies. While this may be an attractive strategy to bolster enforcement efforts against overseas illicit procurement such tools are not without consequence.

South China Sea claims map

VOA

Seminar - Open to the Public

Calculating Bully: Explaining Chinese Coercion

Thu., Mar. 8, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Ketian Zhang, Research Fellow, International Security Program

This seminar will zoom in on the temporal trends of Chinese coercion in the South China Sea as well as on one case, the 2012 Scarborough incident between China and the Philippines.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

 Capt Richard C. Zilmer leads his Company F, Battalion Landing Team 2/8 Marines ashore from the landing ship Saginaw (LST 1188) at the port of Beirut on 29 September 1982.

U.S. Navy

Seminar - Open to the Public

Reagan's Retreat: Lebanon and the Limits of U.S. Power, 1981–1985

Thu., Mar. 1, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Alexandra Tejblum Evans, Ernest May Fellow in History & Policy, International Security Program

This presentation will evaluate U.S. policy toward Lebanon from 1981–1985, tracing the gradual expansion and rapid contraction of American efforts to stabilize a complex civil and regional conflict. By situating the United States' diplomatic and military interventions within a broader effort to strengthen American influence in the Middle East, it will demonstrate how the experience shaped the Reagan administration's perception of threat—and opportunity—in a moment of structural change. It will identify persistent barriers to U.S. interests in a vital region and shed light on how American leaders learn through crisis.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics

Thu., Feb. 22, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speakers: Peter Krause, Co-Editor, Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International PoliticsPhil M. Haun, Dean of Academics, U.S. Naval War College; Tristan Volpe, Assistant Professor, Defense Analysis Department, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School

A discussion of the new edited volume, Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics, by a co-editor and two of the contributing authors.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

A mockup of the Fat Man nuclear device.

U.S. Department of Defense

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Elite Taboo Against Using Nuclear Weapons: Evidence from Wargames

Wed., Feb. 21, 2018 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Speaker: Reid Pauly, Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Is there a normative prohibition on the use of nuclear weapons? Recent scholarship has cast doubt on the existence of a norm of nuclear non-use among the American people. But the public does not make decisions about using nuclear weapons. In this presentation, Pauly investigates the willingness of American policymakers to use nuclear weapons through the history of political-military wargaming. He tests competing theories about the use and non-use of nuclear weapons by examining both whether strategic elites were willing to use nuclear weapons in different scenarios and how they explained those decisions.

This map shows the traditional locations of "First World" (blue), "Second World" (red), and "Third World" (green) countries during the Cold War.

Wikimedia Commons

Seminar - Open to the Public

Diplomacy: A Rusting Tool of American Statecraft

Thu., Feb. 15, 2018 | 4:15pm - 6:00pm

Bell Hall

Speaker: Ambassador Chas W. Freeman, Jr., Senior Fellow, Watson Center for International and Public Affairs, Brown University

This seminar will explore the nature of diplomacy and its strategic, tactical, and risk management roles in American statecraft. Case studies to be discussed include those of U.S. Cold War diplomacy in southern Africa and on the Taiwan issue as well as examples from European history, the Middle East, and elsewhere.

Please join us! Coffee, tea, and refreshments provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

This seminar is being held under the auspices of the joint HKS/MIT Program on Strategy, Security, and Statecraft.

The amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver (LPD 9) transits the South China Sea at sunset to participate in exercise Cobra Gold 2010. Cobra Gold is an annual exercise designed to create interoperability between the Thai, U.S. and Singaporean task forces, 28 January 2010.

U.S. Navy

Seminar - Open to the Public

Grand Plans in International Relations: U.S. Responses to China's Rise

Thu., Feb. 15, 2018 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

1 Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Nina Silove, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program

This seminar addresses the questions of the existence and effects of comprehensive, long term "grand plans" in international politics and their effects on state behavior by examining a least-likely case for finding the existence of operative plans: the responses of the United States to the rise of China.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.