4213 Items

A missile is launched from a U.S. Navy submarine in the Atlantic Ocean in 1989 (Phil Sandlin/Associated Press).

Phil Sandlin/Associated Press

News - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Say WHAT? — A Case of Low-Yield Nuclear Thinking

    Author:
  • Thomas Gaulkin
| Feb. 14, 2019

Can a small nuclear weapon really make the world safer? In this installment of “Say WHAT?”—the Bulletin video series that casts a clear eye on fuzzy policy—we ask nuclear weapons expert Sébastien Philippe what he thinks about the latest nuclear craze.

The U.S. Capitol is seen at sunrise, in Washington, October 10, 2017

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Protecting Democracy in an Era of Cyber Information War

| February 2019

Citizens voluntarily carry Big Brother and his relatives in their pockets. Along with big data and artificial intelligence, technology has made the problem of defending democracy from information warfare far more complicated than foreseen two decades ago. And while rule of law, trust, truth and openness make democracies asymmetrically vulnerable, they are also critical values to defend.  Any policy to defend against cyber information war must start with the Hippocratic oath: first, do no harm.

a new barrier is built along the Texas-Mexico border near downtown El Paso

AP/Eric Gay

Newspaper Article - The Huffington Post

Border Security Expert Tells 'Mansplaining' Rep. Dan Crenshaw Why A Wall Won't Work

    Author:
  • David Moye
| Feb. 05, 2019

Juliette Kayyem suggested that freshman Texas GOP Representative Dan Crenshaw support his argument on border security with facts — "not with mocking a woman."  This article covers the Twitter exchange.

A man stands resolutely in the way of line of tanks in Tiananmen Square, June 5, 1989.

Jeff Widener (AP)

Newspaper Article - Harvard Gazette

Nonviolent Resistance Proves Potent Weapon

    Author:
  • Michelle Nicholasen
| Feb. 04, 2019

When struggling against an oppressive regime, or otherwise seeking to bring about crucial social change, what would your strategy be? If you think violent resistance increases your odds—guess again. In this interview about her new co-authored book, Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict, Erica Chenoweth turns this old bit of prejudice on its head—as it turns out, nonviolent civil resistance is usually the more successful and effective option.

Women's march 2019

Wikimedia CC/David Geitgey Sierralupe

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The 2019 Women's March Was Bigger Than You Think

| Feb. 01, 2019

After two years of counting political crowds in the United States, the authors find that public demonstrations remain a powerful medium for people who wish to be involved politically. They then analyze the media coverage of the 2019 Women's March.

An Al-Shabab insurgent in Somalia's northern Puntland region

Open source from an Al-Shabab film

Analysis & Opinions - War on the Rocks

The Saga of Mukhtar Robow and Somalia's Fractious Politics

| Jan. 30, 2019

The authors write that much has changed for Mukhtar "Abu Mansur" Robow, a key founding member of the Somali jihadist organization al-Shabaab, over the past decade. In November 2008, al-Shabaab was sweeping across southern and central Somalia toward the capital city of Mogadishu. Robow led the jihadists not only in their fight against the Somali government and allied international forces but also in their enactment of territorial governance and implementation of a harsh form of Islamic law. Ten years later, in October 2018, Robow, who once condemned democracy as "unbelief," announced his candidacy for the presidency of Somalia’s South West State.