15872 Items

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A Framework for Cybersecurity

| December 2018

In this paper, we propose a way of thinking about cybersecurity that unifies the various forms of attack. The framework is two-dimensional, looking at both the goal of the attack and the mechanism for launching the attack. The first dimension looks at the goal of the attack by using the common “CIA” triad to categorize the target—that is, whether the attack affects a system’s confidentiality, integrity, or availability (CIA). The second dimension is unique to our knowledge and differentiates attacks based on how the attacks obtain a thread of control.

Vladimir Putin March 2018

Wikimedia Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Fox News

Ex-CIA Chief of Station: How should the US handle Russian aggression? Here are four things that need to happen

| Dec. 13, 2018

Russian President Vladimir Putin has made clear by his actions that his chief foreign policy goals are to destabilize the U.S. internally, drive a wedge between America and our NATO allies, and enhance his influence in neighboring countries.

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project and Enel Foundation Host COP-24 Panel on Implementing Article 6 of the Paris Agreement

    Author:
  • Doug Gavel
| Dec. 13, 2018

The critical role that market mechanisms can play in international global climate change efforts was the focus of discussion Tuesday (Dec. 11) at an official side event at the 24th meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties (COP) in Katowice, Poland. The event, “Elaborating and Implementing Article 6 of the Paris Agreement,” was co-hosted by the Enel Foundation and the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements. It attracted more than 200 audience members inside the Pavilion, and thousands of others viewing the live webcast around the world.

Prime Minister May Addresses British Parliament

CNN

Analysis & Opinions - The Brookings Institution

Brexit Endgame: Theresa May’s Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Week

| Dec. 12, 2018

On Tuesday, British members of Parliament  were scheduled to hold a “meaningful vote” on the Brexit deal: a 585-page withdrawal agreement negotiated over 16 months and a 26-page political declaration on the future relationship between the U.K. and EU. But on Monday, British Prime Minister Theresa May cancelled the vote because it “would be rejected by a significant margin.”

Ms. Meng, the chief financial officer of the telecommunications giant Huawei, was arrested last week by Canadian authorities at the request of the American government on suspicion of fraud related to Iranian sanctions.

Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Trump’s Intervention in Huawei Case Would Be Legal, but Bad Precedent, Experts Say

| Dec. 12, 2018

When President Trump said in an interview this week that he was willing to intercede in the case of a Chinese telecom executive facing extradition to the United States if it helped achieve “the largest trade deal ever made,” it was a clear signal that his White House saw no problem intervening in the justice system to achieve what it considered economic gain.

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Policy Evolution Under the Clean Air Act

| November 2018

The U.S. Clean Air Act, passed in 1970 with strong bipartisan support, was the first environmental law to give the Federal government a serious regulatory role, established the architecture of the U.S. air pollution control system, and became a model for subsequent environmental laws in the United States and globally. We outline the Act’s key provisions, as well as the main changes Congress has made to it over time. We assess the evolution of air pollution control policy under the Clean Air Act, with particular attention to the types of policy instruments used. We provide a generic assessment of the major types of policy instruments, and we trace and assess the historical evolution of EPA’s policy instrument use, with particular focus on the increased use of market-based policy instruments, beginning in the 1970s and culminating in the 1990s.

Discussion Paper - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

GHG Cap-and-Trade: Implications for Effective and Efficient Climate Policy in Oregon

| November 2018

Like many other states, Oregon has begun to pursue climate policies to attempt to fill the gap created by the lack of effective climate policy at the Federal level. After adopting a variety of policies to address climate change and other environmental impacts from energy use, Oregon is now contemplating the adoption of a greenhouse gas (GHG) cap-and-trade system. However, interactions between policies can have important consequences for environmental and economic outcomes. Thus, as Oregon considers taking this step, reconsidering the efficacy of its other current climate policies may better position the state to achieve long-run emission reductions at sustainable economic costs.