15327 Items

Book - Random House/Crown

The Perfect Weapon

| June 19, 2018

For 70 years, the thinking inside the Pentagon was that only nations with nuclear weapons could threaten America’s existence. But that assumption is now in doubt: in a world in which almost everything is interconnected – phones, cars, electrical grids, and satellites – everything can be disrupted, if not destroyed. In THE PERFECT WEAPON, Belfer Center Senior Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy David Sanger, the New York Times national security correspondent, details how this new revolution, being conducted largely in secret, is reshaping global power.

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Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Tarek Masoud Named New Faculty Chair of Harvard Kennedy School’s Middle East Initiative

| June 18, 2018

Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs today announced that Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations Tarek Masoud will serve as faculty chair of the Center’s Middle East Initiative (MEI).

Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, commander of U.S. Army Cyber Command, speaks at the ARCYBER-led Total Army Cyber Summit at Fort Belvoir, Va. on Feb. 22, 2017. Nakasone is responsible for planning cyber operations to disable Iran's air defense systems in case of conflict. 

Tanic Murphy/U.S. Army Cyber Command

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Pentagon Puts Cyberwarriors on the Offensive, Increasing the Risk of Conflict

| June 17, 2018

The Pentagon has quietly empowered the United States Cyber Command to take a far more aggressive approach to defending the nation against cyberattacks, a shift in strategy that could increase the risk of conflict with the foreign states that sponsor malicious hacking groups.

US President Donald J. Trump walked with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12

Korean Central News Agency via Reuters

Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

Beyond the Trump-Kim Summit: A Coalition is Critical for Achieving Denuclearization

| June 16, 2018

In the wake of US President Donald J. Trump’s June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, R. Nicholas Burns, an Atlantic Council board member who served as US undersecretary of state from 2005 to 2008, discussed the tough work that lies ahead and lessons from a not too distant past.

Burns spoke in a phone interview with the New Atlanticist’s Ashish Kumar Sen. Here are excerpts from our interview.

Trump and Kim at summit

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Grading the Singapore Summit: Compared to What?

| June 15, 2018

In the hyperpolarized state of American politics and policy debate, both critics and supporters of the Trump administration have become so predictable that they are now background noise. If required to summarize my assessment of the Trump-Kim summit in one line, it would be: oversold and undervalued. Despite their best efforts, his critics haven’t come close to matching Trump’s preposterous claim that “There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.”

Dr. Arun Majumdar

DOE/Ken Shipp

Journal Article - Research Policy

Simultaneous Pursuit of Discovery and Invention in the US Department of Energy

There is a sharp boundary between basic and applied research in the organizational structure of the US Department of Energy (DOE). In this work, the authors consider a branch of DOE that was designed to operate across this boundary: the Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy (ARPA-E). They hypothesize that much of energy research cannot be neatly categorized as basic or applied and is more productive outside of the confines of the basic/applied dichotomy; ARPA-E provides an opportunity to test that hypothesis.

Sailors line up on U.S. navy nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan as some U.S. flag-shaped balloons are hoisted to welcome them at the U.S. Navy's Yokosuka base in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, October 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko

Magazine Article - Foreign Affairs

The Myth of the Liberal Order

| July/August 2018

Among the debates that have swept the U.S. foreign policy community since the beginning of the Trump administration, alarm about the fate of the liberal international rules-based order has emerged as one of the few fixed points. From the international relations scholar G. John Ikenberry’s claim that “for seven decades the world has been dominated by a western liberal order” to U.S. Vice President Joe Biden’s call in the final days of the Obama administration to “act urgently to defend the liberal international order,” this banner waves atop most discussions of the United States’ role in the world.