1982 Items

Windmills operate at the Da Bancheng Wind Farm, Xinjiang, China


Journal Article - Environmental Research Letters

Why is China's Wind Power Generation Not Living Up to its Potential?

Following a decade of unprecedented investment, China now has the world's largest installed base of wind power capacity. Yet, despite siting most wind farms in the wind-rich Northern and Western provinces, electricity generation from Chinese wind farms has not reached the performance benchmarks of the United States and many other advanced economies. This has resulted in lower environmental, economic, and health benefits than anticipated. The authors develop a framework to explain the performance of the Chinese and US wind sectors, accounting for a comprehensive set of driving factors.

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Journal Article - H-Diplo

H-Diplo Article Review No. 750—'Missing Revolution: The American Intelligence Failure in Iraq, 1958'

  • Salim Yaqub
| Mar. 15, 2018

"Jeffrey Karam is to be commended for writing such a richly researched and cogently reasoned article, one that invites invigorating reexamination, by historians and political scientists alike, of a pivotal moment in modern Middle Eastern history."

Andrew Wakefield arrives at the General Medical Council in London to face a disciplinary panel investigating allegations of serious professional misconduct.


Journal Article - Science

The Science of Fake News

  • David Lazer
  • Matthew A Baum
  • Yochai Benkler
  • Adam J Berinsky
  • Filippo Menczer
  • Miriam J Metzger
  • Brendan Nyhan
  • Gordon Pennycook
  • David Rothschild
  • Michael Schudson
  • Steven A Sloman
  • Cass R. Sunstein
  • Emily A Thorson
  • Duncan J Watts
| Mar. 08, 2018

The rise of fake news highlights the erosion of long-standing institutional bulwarks against misinformation in the internet age. Concern over the problem is global. However, much remains unknown regarding the vulnerabilities of individuals, institutions, and society to manipulations by malicious actors. A new system of safeguards is needed.

Journal Article - International Journal of Military History and Historiography

Review of The Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan by Aqil Shah

| 2017

"This book serves as an invaluable resource for scholars, analysts and policymakers seeking to understand the precise nature of military influence in Pakistan's political development, and evaluate its prospects for deepening democratisation. The volume traces the origins, perpetuation, and consequences of military dominance in the evolution of Pakistan's national politics and institutions."

During, "Intelligence gathering in the 21st century," Nick Burns (from left) and Ash Carter listen as John Sawers, former head of MI6, discusses the challenges of the modern intelligence industry.

Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Newspaper Article - Harvard Gazette

Goodbye James Bond, Hello Big Data

  • Christina Pazzanese
| Feb. 28, 2018

Following a distinguished career in diplomacy (he also was British ambassador to the United Nations and Egypt), Sawers is at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) this week speaking about national security, intelligence, diplomacy, and public service as a Fisher Family Fellow. During a talk Monday, he encouraged listeners thinking of pursuing a career in government to look beyond the typically modest pay such work affords compared with careers in business or the law.

David Miliband and Nick Burns

Martha Stewart

Newspaper Article - Harvard Crimson

Former Diplomats Discuss Global Refugee Crisis

| Feb. 23, 2018

David W. Miliband, president and CEO of the International Refugee Committee, discussed the global refugee crisis with Kennedy School professor Nicholas Burns at an Institute of Politics event Thursday evening.

At the event, entitled “The Refugee Crisis and What Can Be Done About It,” Miliband and Burns, who served as the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs during the Bush administration, discussed ongoing humanitarian challenges in Syria, connecting the issue to a broader “forgotten crisis” of global population displacement.

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Journal Article - Nonproliferation Review

China’s Nuclear Modernization: Assuring a Second-Strike Capability

| Feb. 11, 2018

Some experts are increasingly concerned that China’s modernization will lead to a Chinese nuclear “breakout”—a pursuit of a nuclear-warfighting capability or a “sprint to parity” with the United States. David Logan (“Hard Constraints on a Chinese Nuclear Breakout,” Vol. 24, Nos. 1–2, 2017, pp. 13–30) rightly suggests that such a nuclear breakout would be constrained not only by China’s “soft” nuclear policy but also by “hard” technical constraints. I would emphasize that it is the former that has been the first principle guiding China’s nuclear-force development. That some of the “hard” technical constrains have resulted from this “soft” guidance demonstrates China’s commitment to a small deterrent force. It is difficult to imagine that the future development of China’s nuclear force would eventually overthrow these first principles. In fact, there is no evidence that China will change its long-standing nuclear policy.