Economics & Global Affairs

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Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Recognizing the Limitations of American Influence in Iran

| Feb. 14, 2018

It is time for a reality check: despite claims to the contrary by Iran’s supreme leader, the United States is not the central actor in the drama that recently unfolded in Iran, nor was it the central actor in Egypt back in 2011. The mass protests that forced the Egyptian dictator from power were driven by the Egyptian public’s growing disenchantment with decades of political, economic and social mismanagement by a succession of military rulers. Contemporary observers noted with surprise the absence of references to the United States or other foreign-policy considerations during the protests. The demonstrators’ recurrent chant—“bread, freedom, social justice and human dignity”—encapsulated the domestic motivations behind the public’s mobilization.

Solar panel field and wind turbines

PIXNIO / hpgruesen

Book - Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Handbook of the International Political Economy of Energy and Natural Resources

| 2018

This Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the latest research from leading scholars on the international political economy of energy and resources. Highlighting the important conceptual and empirical themes, the chapters study all levels of governance, from global to local, and explore the wide range of issues emerging in a changing political and economic environment.

Exterior of a Wells Fargo bank location in Philadelphia on Friday, August 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Wells Fargo’s Board Members are Getting Off Too Easy

| Feb. 06, 2018

A question I am asked as frequently as any other is: “Why didn’t anyone go to jail for the financial crisis?” There was huge suffering, sufficient misbehavior that the largest banks had to pay well over $100 billion in fines, and in the past, people had gone to jail for financial shenanigans during the Depression and the S&L crisis. People are usually indignant as they ask the question.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry stands with other Foreign Ministers whose countries are members of the Gulf Cooperation Council following a meeting on January 23, 2016, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

U.S. Department of State

Journal Article - New Political Economy

Domestic Sources of Twenty-first-century Geopolitics: Domestic Politics and Sovereign Wealth Funds in GCC Economies

| Feb. 05, 2018

The present article brings domestic politics into an analysis on sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) that are relevant for the study of contemporary geopolitics. What are the domestic drivers behind SWF creation, and how does a country’s domestic political environment affect the creation of these funds? Using a comparative historical case study on sovereign funds in Gulf Cooperation Countries, this article investigates the effects of domestic state–society structures on decisions about SWF creation and their evolving structure.

Analysis & Opinions

A Humpty Dumpty Europe, feat. Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook

| Feb. 01, 2018

As the clock ticks down to the United Kingdom’s Brexit, Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook considers the EU’s future and the delicate balance of 21st-century statecraft, including EU-US relations as well as negotiation practice, international conflict mitigation and the impact of technology and communication on diplomatic and non-governmental actors. Hosted by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth

Video

The Revolution in American Trade Policy

| Jan. 30, 2018

Former US Trade Representative Michael B. Froman joined moderator Nicholas Burns, the Faculty Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project at HKS, in conversation at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum.  Larry Summers, the Charles W. Eliot University Professor of Harvard University, introduced the program. Froman discussed NAFTA, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, intellectual property rights, the US-China trade relationship, and the impacts of technology and globalization.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks as he walks during the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

(AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

News - The Indian Express

David Petraeus Interview: ‘Trump’s Pak Tweet an Accumulation of Many Administrations’ Frustration’

    Author:
  • Sushant Singh
| Jan. 29, 2018

General David Petraeus (retired), who was head of the CIA from 2010 to 2011, commanded the US-led multinational force in Iraq from 2007 to 2008 and the coalition forces in Afghanistan from 2010 to 2011, besides being head of US military’s Central Command from 2008 to 2010. Currently a partner in a New York investment firm, KKR, he was in India recently.

Alibaba founder Jack Ma speaks during the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Meet the Man Poised to Take Over the World Economy

| Jan. 29, 2018

The most interesting man at Davos was not He Who Must Not Be Named. (In the style of the Harry Potter books, I’m going to omit the name of the Dark Lord, otherwise known as the president of the United States. To be frank, I’m bored of him.) No, the most interesting man at this year’s World Economic Forum was a rather scrawny 53-year-old former English teacher from Hangzhou in eastern China whose business is poised to take over the world economy: Jack Ma, the founder and chairman of Alibaba.

Symbolic pipes with a sign that reads "Turkmenistan—China" on exhibit at the Bagtyyarlyk natural gas field, Turkmenistan, Aug. 29, 2007.

AP / Alexander Vershinin

Analysis & Opinions - World Politics Review

In the Race for Central Asia’s Gas, China’s Rise Comes at Russia’s Expense

| Jan. 26, 2018

Last week, Kazakhstan’s president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, became the first Central Asian head of state to visit President Donald Trump in the White House, in a likely effort to shore up ties. In an email interview, Morena Skalamera, an associate at the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard’s Belfer Center, examines the competition over Central Asia’s gas resources and its geopolitical consequences.