Governance

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Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Recognizing the Limitations of American Influence in Iran

| Feb. 14, 2018

It is time for a reality check: despite claims to the contrary by Iran’s supreme leader, the United States is not the central actor in the drama that recently unfolded in Iran, nor was it the central actor in Egypt back in 2011. The mass protests that forced the Egyptian dictator from power were driven by the Egyptian public’s growing disenchantment with decades of political, economic and social mismanagement by a succession of military rulers. Contemporary observers noted with surprise the absence of references to the United States or other foreign-policy considerations during the protests. The demonstrators’ recurrent chant—“bread, freedom, social justice and human dignity”—encapsulated the domestic motivations behind the public’s mobilization.

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Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The World After Trump

| March/April 2018 Issue

The warnings started long before Donald Trump was even a presidential candidate. For at least a decade, a growing chorus of foreign policy experts had been pointing to signs that the international order was coming apart. Authoritarian powers were flouting long-accepted rules. Failed states were radiating threats. Economies were being disrupted by technology and globalization; political systems, by populism. Meanwhile, the gap in power and influence between the United States—the leader and guarantor of the existing order—and the rest of the world was closing.

U.S. United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, and Israel's U.N. Ambassador Danny Danon exchange handshakes

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Times of Israel

Israel is Fighting BDS the Wrong Way

| Feb. 12, 2018

Fifty years of efforts have failed to convince the international community of the merits of the settlement policy, which it considers counterproductive, first and foremost, to Israel’s own interest in maintaining its Jewish and democratic character and in achieving peace. No matter how much Israel invests in the battle against BDS and delegitimization, it will not be able to change the international image that Israel has come to bear the primary responsibility for the diplomatic impasse.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis takes his seat for a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Axios

Trump's Nuclear Review Could Trigger a Chain Reaction in Asia

| Feb. 08, 2018

"Just as U.S. nuclear strategy and arsenal expansions affect those of China, China's nuclear shifts affect India's threat perceptions. Pakistan, in turn, pays close attention to any growth in Indian nuclear forces. To avoid a nuclear chain reaction in Asia, Congress should take a stand against proliferation and refuse to fund these new weapons programs."

Dr. Amanda Sloat presents at the Harvard Kennedy School

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Analysis & Opinions - Future of Diplomacy Project

Conversations in Diplomacy: Amanda Sloat

| Feb. 06, 2018

In this installation of the 'Conversations in Diplomacy' podcast, Dr. Amanda Sloat, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Southern Europe and Eastern Mediterranean Affairs at the State Department, for a conversation on U.S.-Turkey relationship and the future of Syria with Faculty Director Nicholas Burns.

US Army Soldiers at Fort Bragg, NC September 13, 2017 (Johnathon Drake/Reuters). Keywords: Fort Bragg

Johnathon Drake/Reuters

Analysis & Opinions - Carnegie Moscow Center

Making Sense of the U.S. National Defense Strategy

| Feb. 05, 2018

Many of the threats and missions identified in the 2018 National Defense Strategy Summary are similar to those of earlier defense strategies. But the priorities have changed dramatically. The 2018 NDS declares that “interstate strategic competition, not terrorism, is now the primary national security concern,” and the United States is in a “long-term strategic competition” with its main adversaries Russia and China.

President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. January 30, 2018 (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press).

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Trump 2020? Possible, But Through Path of Potholes

| Feb. 05, 2018

Two forces are now at work, both of which hurt the Democrats. The first is the slow, far-from-steady but nevertheless perceptible stabilization of Trump’s administration as chief of staff John Kelly has tightened his grip on the post-Bannon White House. The second is the economy. The employment report last week seemed to vindicate Trump’s tub-thumping: Not only were 200,000 new jobs created in January, but average hourly wages were 2.9 percent higher than a year before, the strongest number since the financial crisis struck in 2009.

Aziza Yousef drives a car on a highway in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. The ban is expected to end in June 2018. March 29, 2014. (Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File). Keywords: Aziza Yousef, Saudi driving ban

Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Saudi Reforms Get a Boost From Google

| Feb. 04, 2018

Since Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman announced his intention to transform this country nearly two years ago, Saudis and foreigners alike have questioned whether he is serious or merely enjoying power. The time for doubt is over. Last week’s news that Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is in talks to build a tech hub in the kingdom is only the latest sign. Look for more such initiatives when the crown prince visits the U.S. in early March.