International Relations

4683 Items

Book - Oxford University Press

Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics

Coercion moves beyond these somewhat hidebound premises and examines the critical issue of coercion in the 21st century, with a particular focus on new actors, strategies and objectives in this very old bargaining game. The chapters in this volume examine intra-state, inter-state, and transnational coercion and deterrence as well as both military and non-military instruments of persuasion, thus expanding our understanding of coercion for conflict in the 21st century.

Massachusetts Hall, Harvard University

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

America's IR Schools Are Broken

| Feb. 20, 2018

"One obvious problem is that the conduct of 'international affairs' is not really a professional vocation, but rather a political one. Influential foreign-policy leaders are not chosen strictly for their expertise but also for their ideological convictions, reputations, personal connections, and political loyalty."

Visitors walk past a display of Cold War-era tanks at the Royal Tank Museum in Amman, Jordan on Thursday, February 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)

AP Photo/Sam McNeil

News - Harvard Gazette

The Cold War’s Endless Ripples

    Author:
  • John Laidler
| Feb. 16, 2018

As an international historian, Odd Arne Westad may be best known for bringing a fresh interpretation to the Cold War in which he argues that the era began much earlier and extended much farther than popularly thought.

Those and other themes are explored in detail in a comprehensive new history of the Cold War written by Westad, the S.T. Lee Professor of U.S.-Asia Relations at Harvard, where he teaches at the Kennedy School.

Iran US America Flag

Wikimedia

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Recognizing the Limitations of American Influence in Iran

| Feb. 14, 2018

It is time for a reality check: despite claims to the contrary by Iran’s supreme leader, the United States is not the central actor in the drama that recently unfolded in Iran, nor was it the central actor in Egypt back in 2011. The mass protests that forced the Egyptian dictator from power were driven by the Egyptian public’s growing disenchantment with decades of political, economic and social mismanagement by a succession of military rulers. Contemporary observers noted with surprise the absence of references to the United States or other foreign-policy considerations during the protests. The demonstrators’ recurrent chant—“bread, freedom, social justice and human dignity”—encapsulated the domestic motivations behind the public’s mobilization.

United Nations General Assembly Hall in the UN Headquarters, New York.

Basil D Soufi

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

The World After Trump

| March/April 2018 Issue

The warnings started long before Donald Trump was even a presidential candidate. For at least a decade, a growing chorus of foreign policy experts had been pointing to signs that the international order was coming apart. Authoritarian powers were flouting long-accepted rules. Failed states were radiating threats. Economies were being disrupted by technology and globalization; political systems, by populism. Meanwhile, the gap in power and influence between the United States—the leader and guarantor of the existing order—and the rest of the world was closing.

A view of the Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock, some of the holiest sites for for Jews and Muslims, is seen in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017.

AP Photo/Oded Balilty

News

Event Podcast: Jerusalem in Context: Place, People, and Politics

Feb. 13, 2018

A panel discussion with Salim Tamari, Spring 2018 Shawwaf Visiting Professor, Harvard Center for Middle Eastern Studies and Professor Emeritus of Sociology, Birzeit University; Anat Biletski, Albert Schweitzer Professor of Philosophy, Quinnipiac University; and Robert Danin, Senior Fellow for Middle East Studies, Council on Foreign Relations and Senior Fellow, Future Diplomacy Project, HKS.

Solar panel field and wind turbines

PIXNIO / hpgruesen

Book - Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Handbook of the International Political Economy of Energy and Natural Resources

| 2018

This Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the latest research from leading scholars on the international political economy of energy and resources. Highlighting the important conceptual and empirical themes, the chapters study all levels of governance, from global to local, and explore the wide range of issues emerging in a changing political and economic environment.