International Relations

479 Items

Debris flies as Philippine Air Force fighter jets bomb suspected locations of Muslim militants in Marawi city, southern Philippines on Friday, June 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File)

AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File

Analysis & Opinions - The South China Morning Post

How Political Islam is Gaining Ground in Southeast Asia Despite The Fall of Islamic State

| Feb. 06, 2018

The results of upcoming elections in Malaysia and Indonesiawill provide a scorecard for the inroads made by political Islam in Southeast Asia’s two key Muslim-majority countries. In Malaysia, which will hold a general election this year, the standard-bearer of political Islam is the Parti Islam SeMalaysia. In Indonesia, which will have its presidential election next year, the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) represents Islam in the political mainstream. But also powerful is the Front Pembela Islam, a vigilante group which registers its presence mostly through demonstrations and intimidation.

In this photo released by the state-run Saudi Press Agency, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks at a meeting of the Islamic Military Counterterrorism Alliance in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Nov. 26, 2017 (Saudi Press Agency via AP).

Saudi Press Agency via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

The Plot Behind Saudi Arabia's Fight With Qatar

| Dec. 04, 2017

The recently promoted heir to the Saudi throne, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, known as M.B.S., has pledged to modernize the country. His agenda includes diversifying the Saudi economy beyond oil, expanding trade, bolstering employment and loosening restrictions on entertainment. But at least two domestic factors complicate his ambitions, and we may see them play out on the world stage in 2018.

A black-and-white depiction of Qatar's emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, attracts signatures and comments of support from residents amid a diplomatic crisis between Qatar and neighboring Arab countries in Doha, Qatar, on July 3, 2017 (AP Photo/Maggie Hyde).

AP Photo/Maggie Hyde

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Qatar is at the Center of Today's Arab Tangle

| Nov. 15, 2017

A speedy but proper resolution of the standoff with Qatar is clearly in American interests. Consistent with President Trump’s May 20 Riyadh speech, and his just-announced plan of action against Iran, such a resolution must include Doha’s cessation of all forms of support for extremist Islamic movements and the end of its flirtation with Tehran.

An Egyptian youth carries a lit flare


Discussion Paper - International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Muslim Brotherhood Movement in the Arab Winter

| September 2017

Although it may seem that the Muslim Brotherhood has weakened since the onset of the "Arab Winter" in 2013 and onward, organizations with their origins in the Brotherhood still have access to power in countries as diverse as Somalia, Bahrain, Morocco, and Yemen, and might regain power in other countries as well. Most Brotherhood-affiliated movements are committed to some form of democracy, unlike many of their rivals in the Middle East. Even the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia have sought allies among Brotherhood affiliates, despite banning a majority of affiliated organizations.  A critical dialogue can promote Brotherhood thinking that supports political consensus, ease the transition to a more stable Middle East, and support a positive direction in political Islam.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson escorts Qatar's Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani to the Treaty Room of the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Qatar Is Playing a Dangerous Game of Political Chicken

| Aug. 06, 2017

Last month a Saudi-led group of nations that includes Egypt, UAE and Bahrain modified the thirteen demands it had made on Qatar over a month ago and instead insisted on six principles. These principles are an attempt to convince the Qataris to combat extremism and terror, to prevent the expression of incitement to violence, to stop interfering in the internal affairs of other states, and to refrain from supporting illegal entities, among other things. And while moving from making demands to urging an acceptance of principles is being spoken of as a reconciliatory gesture on the part of the anti-Qatar bloc, the central contentious issue remains: Qatar’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood. The Saudi coalition knows what the experiences of numerous Muslim governments have long proven: the Muslim Brotherhood is an oppositionist movement that does not represent a sustainable form of governance, offers little in the way of social or economic programs, and some of its members have been linked to political violence and jihadist terror.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson gestures as he responds to a reporter's question during a meeting with Qatar's Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Tillerson Can End the Qatar Standoff

  • Dennis Ross
| Aug. 01, 2017

"Defeating Islamic State is the Trump administration’s most important national-security priority. But removing ISIS from Mosul and Raqqa may end up meaning little absent the ability to secure, reconstruct and govern these and other cities. Preventing a dangerous power vacuum from forming in areas liberated from ISIS control requires the urgent involvement of unified Sunni Arab states."

In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014 file photo, Jordanian children chant anti-Israel slogans during a Muslim Brotherhood Islamic movement protest in front of the Israeli embassy in Amman, Jordan. A diplomatic standoff between Qatar and a quartet of Arab nations accusing it of sponsoring terrorism has thrust a spotlight on an opaque network of charities and prominent figures freely operating in Qatar. (AP Photo, File)

AP Photo, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Telegraph

The Saudi Coalition Is Right. Qatar's Support for the Muslim Brotherhood Must Not Stand

| July 19, 2017

The Saudi coalition knows what the experiences of numerous Muslim governments have long proven: the Muslim Brotherhood is an oppositionist movement that does not represent a sustainable form of governance, offers little in the way of  social or economic programmes, and some of its members have been linked to political violence and jihadist terror.

People pray at an open air makeshift mosque in front of a giant Saudi Flag in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, Wednesday, June 21, 2017. Saudi Arabia's King Salman on Wednesday appointed his 31-year-old son Mohammed bin Salman as crown prince. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Analysis & Opinions - New York Daily News

The Path to a New Saudi Arabia

  • Dennis Ross
| June 29, 2017

"Saudi Arabia has a new crown prince. Mohammed bin Salman, known as MbS, is clearly now slated to succeed his father, King Salman. At 31, the kingdom has never seen anyone like him. He has been given very wide responsibilities as defense minister and overseer of the Saudi economy and its transformation. As one Saudi minister said to me shortly before I met him, “You are about to meet our force of nature.”"