Science & Technology

2167 Items

Huawei's logo stands tall on this R&D center in China's Guangdong province, December 18, 2018..

Andy Wong (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - Financial Times

Blanket Bans on Chinese Tech Companies Like Huawei Make No Sense

| Feb. 12, 2019

The unfolding Huawei controversy demands "technical expertise and rational assessment of risk", writes Robert Hannigan in the wake of the President Trump's statements about the possible extradition of the company's chief financial officer. Geopolitics and business should be separate considerations, especially since the growing concern over the cyber threat that China poses may not be supported by the evidence.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Bruce Schneier on Office Hours Podcast

| Feb. 11, 2019

Cybersecurity expert Bruce Schneier, author of the “Schneier on Security” blog and a Research Fellow with the Belfer Center’s Cyber Security Project, sits down with with Aroop Mukharji to talk about cybersecurity and tech, his book "Click Here to Kill Everybody," and the hacker mentality.

Army Lieutenant General Paul Nakasone waits at the witness table in the U.S. Senate

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The U.S. Military is Quietly Launching Efforts to Deter Russian Meddling

| Feb. 07, 2019

With little public fanfare, U.S. Cyber Command, the military’s new center for combating electronic attacks against the United States, has launched operations to deter and disrupt Russians who have been interfering with the U.S. political system.

The U.S. Capitol is seen at sunrise, in Washington, October 10, 2017

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Protecting Democracy in an Era of Cyber Information War

| February 2019

Citizens voluntarily carry Big Brother and his relatives in their pockets. Along with big data and artificial intelligence, technology has made the problem of defending democracy from information warfare far more complicated than foreseen two decades ago. And while rule of law, trust, truth and openness make democracies asymmetrically vulnerable, they are also critical values to defend.  Any policy to defend against cyber information war must start with the Hippocratic oath: first, do no harm.

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ending the Cybersecurity Arms Race

| February 2018

Network security has always been something of balancing act between maximizing sharing and ease of use, and erecting barriers.

When computer networks first emerged, there were few limitations on what could be transmitted over them. However, after the world’s first major network computer security incident—the Morris Worm of 1988—organizations began to retreat behind network-level firewalls and anti-virus software. Some defenders even tried to completely disconnect their networks from the outside world via “air gaps.”

This paper argues that it is time to move beyond the security paradigm of separating networks, as epitomized by the air gap. Instead, network defenders should embrace an approach which allows sharing and connectedness, anticipates that adversaries will penetrate the network, and is able to detect, and ultimately eject those adversaries before they can do harm.

Mirrors (heliostats) circle a solar tower in the Negev desert, souther Israel

AP Photo/Oded Balilty

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Envisioning a New Economic Middle East: Reshaping the Gulf with Israel

| Jan. 31, 2019

The hope is that the greater economic cooperation incubating between the Gulf States and Israel will create a culture of entrepreneurship within Gulf economies. In that way, the Gulf States will begin to each adopt a “startup nation” mentality that has been championed in Israel over the past successful several decades.

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future

| Jan. 24, 2019

The Technology and Public Purpose Project held a discussion on “Responsible AI: A Guide to the Future” with Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab and a panel of distinguished speakers working on innovative and emerging AI-based technologies.