Coronavirus

357 Items

A Syrian refugee receives the Chinese-made Sinopharm coronavirus vaccine at a medical center in the Zaatari refugee camp, in Mafraq, about 80 km (50 miles) north of the Jordanian capital Amman, Monday, Feb. 15, 2021.

AP Photo/Raad Adayleh

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Applying Lessons from Other Global Crises to the COVID-19 Pandemic and Future Health Crises

    Authors:
  • Sabs Quereshi
  • Dr. Linda Mobula
  • Dr. Ambrose Otau Talisuna
  • Dr. Esther Tan
| Jan. 12, 2022

Over the course of the history of the humanitarian aid sector, thousands of humanitarian aid workers, including public health, medical and crises response experts from the United States and other nations have been deployed for decades developing and sharpening the technical skills needed in health crises. These experiences and skills can provide a framework to help strengthen health systems, risk communication and community engagement strategies, vaccine rollouts, recovery and overall public health funding in the U.S.

President Joe Biden speaks during a news conference at the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit

AP/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

American Democracy and Soft Power

| Nov. 02, 2021

Joseph Nye writes that as President Joe Biden meets with fellow leaders at COP26, many are asking just how badly U.S. soft power was damaged by Donald Trump's presidency. True, Trump trashed democratic norms that must be restored, but American culture retains great sources of resilience which pessimists often underestimated.

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

How to Make Holiday Gatherings Safer: 6 Things to Keep in Mind

| Oct. 25, 2021

Last year’s holiday season occurred during a raging pandemic and no vaccines in our toolbox. This year’s holiday season has two clear advantages: (1) we have safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 and (2) we’re much more attuned to risk reduction measures like the availability of at-home testing, ventilation, and better masks that can make any type of gathering safer.

Ugandan police and other security forces chase people off the streets to avoid unrest after all public transport was banned for two weeks to halt the spread of the new coronavirus.

AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Opportunistic Repression: Civilian Targeting by the State in Response to COVID-19

    Authors:
  • Donald Grasse
  • Melissa Pavlik
  • Hilary Matfess
  • Travis B. Curtice
| Fall 2021

Opportunistic repression arises when states use crises to suppress the political opposition. An examination of the relationship between COVID-19 shutdown policies and state violence against civilians in Africa, including and a subnational case study of Uganda, tests this theory.

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Journal Article - World Politics Review

Vaccine Rollouts Are an Uphill Battle in the Middle East and North Africa

| Aug. 31, 2021

Many countries across the Middle East and North Africa, or MENA, region have faced critical challenges in ensuring the effective and equitable vaccination of their citizens against COVID-19. With a few exceptions, like Morocco, Israel and several Gulf states, countries in the region have faced difficulties in securing sufficient doses due to logistical constraints, poor planning and vaccine hesitancy. As of mid-August, only 21 percent of the region’s population had received at least one dose, and less than 13 percent were fully vaccinated. This puts the region far behind the developing country average of 36 percent with at least one dose and 22 percent fully vaccinated. Moreover, while some countries have accelerated their vaccination campaigns under the pressure of recent COVID-19 surges, other campaigns seem to be slowing or stalling. As countries brace for new waves of the pandemic, MENA governments—and their international supporters—must find ways to address the root causes of their halting vaccination campaigns.