703 Items

Qumya, Mandate Palestine, 1948.

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Social Cohesion and Community Displacement in Armed Conflict

    Authors:
  • Daniel Arnon
  • Richard J. McAlexander
  • Michael A. Rubin
| Winter 2022/23

Mass killing such as cleansing and genocide is a common occurrence in war. Communities face the terrible choice of leaving their homes ahead of military action, or staying. Analysis of the previously restricted “Village Files,” a Zionist survey of Arab Palestinian communities conducted in the 1940s, finds that the key indicator of whether a community flees imminent violence is social cohesion.

U.S. Army Soldiers share tactics and training with Nigerian Army Soldiers, Nigeria, February 8, 2018.

Capt. James Sheehan, U.S. Army

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

The Cult of the Persuasive: Why U.S. Security Assistance Fails

    Author:
  • Rachel Tecott Metz
| Winter 2022/23

Why does the U.S. Army rely on persuasion to influence military partners to improve their forces despite repeated failures that undermine U.S. foreign policy goals? The army prioritizes its role as a fighting force, not an advisory group. U.S. leaders have developed an ideology—the cult of the persuasive—to advance army bureaucratic interests.

Illustration of Imperial Russian Army light cavalry, early 19th century.

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Push and Pull on the Periphery: Inadvertent Expansion in World Politics

| Winter 2022/23

Great powers may expand their state or empire by choice, or by accident. Nearly 25 percent of important historical instances of great power expansion have been initiated by actors on the periphery without authorization from the center. Leaders at the center are often constrained from withdrawing from new territory, unless they foresee high costs from staying.

A protester holds up a placard outside the U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong, Wednesday, June 26, 2019.

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Nowhere to Hide? Global Policing and the Politics of Extradition

    Author:
  • Daniel Krcmaric
| Fall 2022

U.S. power extends beyond the military and economic spheres to include policing. The United States has used its global policing power to capture terrorists, warlords, and drug kingpins. But extradition is not simply a bureaucratic tool. States’ geopolitical interests shape their willingness to cooperate with others in extraditing fugitives. 

A row of T-34 tanks

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Dangerous Changes: When Military Innovation Harms Combat Effectiveness

    Author:
  • Kendrick Kuo
| Fall 2022

Contrary to the conventional wisdom, military innovation can degrade a state’s military effectiveness as well as strengthen it. In fact, innovation is a gamble that a state may lose, particularly if it is already overextended in its commitments. 

China's maritime claim (red) and UNCLOS exclusive economic zones (blue) in the South China Sea.

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

How Much Risk Should the United States Run in the South China Sea?

| Fall 2022

China’s increasingly assertive behavior in the South China Sea suggests that it wants to dominate that critical area of the globe. How should the United States respond? This article presents three policy options: increase military resistance to Chinese pressure; partially retrench to protect U.S. allies; and maintain current policy, continuing to recognize that U.S. interests in the area are limited.

Map of scheduled airline traffic around the world, circa June 2009.

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

China's Party-State Capitalism and International Backlash: From Interdependence to Insecurity

| Fall 2022

Economic interdependence has long been considered important to international peace. Questions about harmful effects of the free flow of capital, however, are arising. China and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries are increasingly involving their business firms in security and intelligence work, causing a security dilemma dynamic that increases economic competition.

A set of NanoRacks CubeSats is photographed by an Expedition 38 crew member after the deployment by the Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD).

NASA

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Small Satellites, Big Data: Uncovering the Invisible in Maritime Security

    Authors:
  • Saadia Pekkanen
  • Setsuko Aoki
  • John Mittleman
| Fall 2022

The world’s oceans have always provided ships with room to hide. New technology is changing that. Small satellites now collect terabytes of global data daily. Computational analytics can mine that data as humans cannot. Increasingly, this information expands the ability to identify and track ships and their activities, including those affecting national and international security.