3971 Items

Book - Oxford University Press

Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics

Coercion moves beyond these somewhat hidebound premises and examines the critical issue of coercion in the 21st century, with a particular focus on new actors, strategies and objectives in this very old bargaining game. The chapters in this volume examine intra-state, inter-state, and transnational coercion and deterrence as well as both military and non-military instruments of persuasion, thus expanding our understanding of coercion for conflict in the 21st century.

Massachusetts Hall, Harvard University

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

America's IR Schools Are Broken

| Feb. 20, 2018

"One obvious problem is that the conduct of 'international affairs' is not really a professional vocation, but rather a political one. Influential foreign-policy leaders are not chosen strictly for their expertise but also for their ideological convictions, reputations, personal connections, and political loyalty."

People attend a candlelight vigil for the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla. February 15, 2018 (Gerald Herbert/Associated Press). Keywords: Parkland, school shooting

Gerald Herbert/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - CNN

'I'm So Sick of This' — Another Deadly School Shooting

| Feb. 15, 2018

"No other nation suffers as we do because of school shootings; no other nation except ours has these kinds of mass murders; no other nation, with polling showing tremendous support for gun control laws, ignores popular sentiment so successfully at the behest of special interests, like the National Rifle Association — the NRA. No other nation fails its children so spectacularly."

U.S. United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, and Israel's U.N. Ambassador Danny Danon exchange handshakes

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Times of Israel

Israel is Fighting BDS the Wrong Way

| Feb. 12, 2018

Fifty years of efforts have failed to convince the international community of the merits of the settlement policy, which it considers counterproductive, first and foremost, to Israel’s own interest in maintaining its Jewish and democratic character and in achieving peace. No matter how much Israel invests in the battle against BDS and delegitimization, it will not be able to change the international image that Israel has come to bear the primary responsibility for the diplomatic impasse.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis takes his seat for a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Axios

Trump's Nuclear Review Could Trigger a Chain Reaction in Asia

| Feb. 08, 2018

"Just as U.S. nuclear strategy and arsenal expansions affect those of China, China's nuclear shifts affect India's threat perceptions. Pakistan, in turn, pays close attention to any growth in Indian nuclear forces. To avoid a nuclear chain reaction in Asia, Congress should take a stand against proliferation and refuse to fund these new weapons programs."

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Policy Brief

Verifying the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons and Providing Assurance against Breakout

| February 2018

Effective verification will be absolutely essential to achieving nuclear disarmament. Developing effective verification may seem an impossible challenge, but there is substantial experience to build on, including IAEA safeguards and bilateral arms control processes. Examining the specific steps required to progress disarmament, we are not starting with a blank sheet, many verification missions are similar to those existing or under development today. International collaboration in developing new verification applications will contribute to the confidence and trust required to achieve the elimination of nuclear weapons.

Steve Erhart answers a question during a news conference on the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The World Doesn't Need Any More Nuclear Strategies

| Feb. 06, 2018

"In short, the Posture Review is recommending not just the prudent preservation of an effective deterrent; it also wants the American taxpayer to pay for a lot of expensive new ways to use a nuclear bomb. Not because its authors want to fight a nuclear war, mind you, but because they believe having this capability will make their country more secure."