4113 Items

Russian officer prepares to distribute a food aid for local residents in the outskirts of Damascus

AP/Sergei Grits

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

In the Middle East the Russians Aren’t Coming: They Are Back

| Aug. 13, 2018

Chuck Freilich describes Russia's growing influence across the Middle East and North Africa, which includes conventional arms and nuclear reactor sales coupled with deft diplomacy. Vladimir Putin, he argues, is exploiting U.S. disengagement from the region to restore Russia to Great Power status.

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Azharsofii/Wikimedia).

Azharsofii/Wikimedia

Journal Article - European Journal of International Security

Exploring the Use of 'Third Countries' in Proliferation Networks: The Case of Malaysia

| Aug. 10, 2018

‘Third countries’ are frequently exploited by those involved in networks to transfer proliferation-sensitive technologies, allowing procurement agents to obscure the end user or vendor located in the proliferating state, and to deceive industry, export licensing officials, and intelligence services. While ‘third countries’ frequently feature in illicit transactions, the academic literature exploring the roles played by entities in these jurisdictions is limited. Building on the sanctions busting literature, this article proposes a loose typology considering the ways in which third countries can be exploited by proliferation networks. The typology is illustrated using three cases involving entities based in Malaysia – A. Q. Khan’s nuclear black market network, and Iran and North Korea’s efforts to procure and market WMD-related and military goods. These cases are used to generate insights into proliferators’ selection of ‘third country’ hubs. The article argues that while exploitation of third countries by proliferation networks is a similar, but distinct phenomenon to trade-based sanctions busting, hubs of both activities share characteristics. Furthermore, the article argues that other factors beyond the lax regulatory environment, such as level of development, and personal connections, are often as important in driving the decisions of proliferation networks. The article concludes with implications for nonproliferation policy.

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Sean M. Lynn-Jones Announces His Retirement as Editor of the International Security Journal

| Aug. 08, 2018

After thirty-one years as a member of the International Security editorial team, Sean M. Lynn-Jones has decided to step down as editor of the journal at the end of 2018 and to retire from Harvard then. He says, "I have had the privilege of doing a job that I love for a long time. I take considerable satisfaction in the journal’s standing in the field of international security studies and the many outstanding, influential, and award-winning articles it has published during my tenure."

President Lyndon Johnson and South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu, left, talk at Pacific Command Headquarters in Honolulu

AP File Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Project Syndicate

White House of Lies

| Aug. 07, 2018

U.S. President Donald Trump’s supporters justify his mendacity on the grounds that "all politicians lie," and a little introspection leads us to admit that all humans do. But the amount and type of lying make a difference.

UN Headquarters in NYC

Wikimedia CC/Neptuul

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Why I Didn't Sign Up to Defend the International Order

| Aug. 01, 2018

Stephen Walt explains his decision to not sign an ad, signed by a group of prominent scholars, directed at U.S. President Donald Trump's disregard for the various institutions that have been prominent in world politics for the past 6-plus decades. The ad was published in the New York Times in late July 2018.