192 Items

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (left) and Philippine Secretary of National Defense Voltaire Gazmin (right) shake hands on a Marine Corps V-22 Osprey as they depart the USS Stennis after touring the aircraft carrier as it sails the South China Sea April 15, 2016.

SMSgt Adrian Cadiz / DoD

Report

Reflections on American Grand Strategy in Asia

| October 2018

To understand how I approached China during my time as Secretary, it’s important to note that I don’t see U.S. strategy in Asia as centered on China at all. I said many times: We don’t have a China policy, we have an Asia policy. The heart of that policy is a mesh of political, diplomatic, economic, and military relationships with many nations that has sustained security and underwritten an extraordinary leap in economic development.

During my time as Secretary, I referred to this structure over and over as the “principled, inclusive network.” Enunciating and reinforcing its strategic and military dimensions in a rapidly changing security environment was my constant priority as Secretary of Defense. Even amid pressing challenges such as the fight against ISIS and the need to confront Russian aggression, no other issue I dealt with had such lasting implications for our national security and prosperity.

My three-word title for this policy was admittedly not very catchy. But my counterparts in the region understood it. They understood that all three words have been essential to its success and will remain essential to its future.

Speech

Jean-Yves Le Drain and Ash Carter in Conversation – September 28, 2018

| Oct. 03, 2018

Former U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter and French Minister for Europe and Foreign Affairs Jean-Yves Le Drian speak on the topic “Is Democracy Still Alive?” during a public conversation sponsored by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship.

A computer chip, a DNA strand, and a self-driving vehicle

Collage: Adobe Stock / AP

Paper

Shaping Disruptive Technological Change for Public Good

| August 2018

“I use ‘disruptive’ in both its good and bad connotations. Disruptive scientific and technological progress is not to me inherently good or inherently evil. But its arc is for us to shape. Technology’s progress is furthermore in my judgment unstoppable. But it is quite incorrect that it unfolds inexorably according to its own internal logic and the laws of nature.”

teaser image

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

From The Director

| Summer 2018

At many research centers, the mission is found only on an “About Us” page. In our case, the mission is embedded right in our name: the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. The and there is critical. It reflects not a divided research portfolio but rather a singular convergence of the two realms that have the most power to shape humanity’s course—for better or worse—this century.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Carter: Shaping Change for Good

| Summer 2018

Disruptive technological change cannot be stopped, but it can—and must—be shaped for overall human good. This semester, Belfer Center Director Ash Carter joined forces with Frank Doyle, Dean of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, to launch a Faculty Working Group on Technology for Governance and Governance for Technology tackling this issue.