9 Items

An Iraqi soldier gestures at a checkpoint in central Baghdad, June 30, 2009. U.S. troops pulled out of Iraqi cities on June 30 in the first step toward winding down the U.S. war effort by the end of 2011.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Peace with Honor?

| June 30, 2009

"'Peace with honor.' This was the Nixon administration's euphemism for disengagement from South Vietnam, a place where corruption and incompetence had long doomed any hope of victory; even a victory as modest as the simple negative objective of preserving the political independence of tiny South Vietnam."

Book - Cambridge University Press

How the Weak Win Wars: A Theory of Asymmetric Conflict

| December 2005

"In How the Weak Win Wars, Arreguin-Toft means to convince the reader that when the very strong meet the weak in asymmetric armed conflict, strategy matters more than power. Despite minor excursions in his conclusions, he achieves this goal through expert scholarly analysis and a writing style that elucidates complex topics with facility. His work is extremely relevant in the current geopolitical context and serves as a warning to US policy makers to get military strategy right, regardless of relative power. Arreguin-Toft's argument makes perfectly clear the perilous consequences of neglecting the importance of strategic interaction."

— Edward Bradfield, Harvard International Review (Summer 2005)

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Journal Article - Cambridge Review of International Affairs

Tunnel at the End of the Light: A Critique of US Counter-terrorist Grand Strategy

| October 2002

"This essay introduces a theoretically grounded critique of US counterterrorist grand strategy in reaction to the destruction of the World Trade Center's twin towers in New York and a portion of the Pentagon in Washington, DC, on September 11th 2001."

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Journal Article - International Security

How the Weak Win Wars: A Theory of Asymmetric Conflict

| Summer 2001

Ivan Arreguín-Toft of Harvard University offers a theory of asymmetric conflict to explain “how a weak actor’s strategy can make a strong actor’s power irrevlevant.” According to Arreguín-Toft, the interaction of actor strategies is the best predictor of asymmetric conflict outcomes. After providing quantitative and qualitative tests of his theory, he considers some of the implications of his thesis for both theory building and policymaking.