Nuclear Issues

120 Items

Book Chapter - Routledge

Security Challenges and Opportunities in the Twenty-first Century

| 2018

In this chapter, Chuck Freilich presents the regional and global developments and the changes in the nature of the diplomatic and military threats Israel faces that have transformed its strategic environment in recent decades. At 70, Israel continues to face a daunting array of threats, as do few states in the world. Israel has, however, won the battle for its existence and is stronger militarily and more secure today than ever before. Furthermore, it has ties with more states than ever before, including a unique relationship with the United States, and a vibrant economy that has grown rapidly in recent decades, turning Israel into an international leader in high-tech.

Donald Trump

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Top Five Foreign-Policy Blunders Trump Hasn't Made Yet

| Aug. 04, 2017

"As bad as Trump's first six months have been, there are a number of major foreign-policy blunders he hasn’t made yet and for which we should therefore be grateful. Unfortunately, there are also signs he's contemplating several of them, and plunging ahead may look more tempting as his political fortunes erode. The more desperate he gets, the more he may be inclined to divert attention from his incompetence here at home by stirring up trouble somewhere else."

F-35 fighter jet in Israel

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Newsweek

How Long Could Israel Survive Without America?

| July 14, 2017

"From the vantage point of contemporary readers, it may be surprising to learn that the US–Israeli relationship was actually quite limited and even cool until the late 1960s. It then evolved into a more classic patron-client relationship in the 1970s, and only in the 1980s started to become the institutionalised, strategic relationship that we know today."

Statue commemorating Senator Barry Goldwater in National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

Gage Skidmore/CC

Analysis & Opinions - The Daily Beast

Compared to Trump, Goldwater Was a Sensible Moderate

| September 17, 2016

"Historians, trained to take the long view but living in the here and now, have been struggling to make sense of Donald Trump's chaotic bid to win the presidency and thus become the commander-in-chief of the most powerful military force in the world."

Donald Trump speaking at a rally in Fountain Hills, Arizona, March 20, 2016.

(Gage Skidmore CC)

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

No, @realDonaldTrump Is Not a Realist

| April 1, 2016

"...[R]ealists in academia and in the policy world support the basic principles of free trade and oppose the protectionist ideas Trump routinely invokes. Realists favor free trade not because they believe economic interdependence guarantees peace, but because they regard economic power as the foundation of national strength and international influence, and they believe protectionism and autarky are strategies that weaken a state's economy over time. Trump is correct that one needs a strong economy to be a great power — let alone a global superpower — but his ideas on how to preserve that status are so … well, 17th century."

Analysis & Opinions - The Huffington Post

A Lack of Bombast

| December 15, 2015

"Barack Obama's tenure, particularly his second term, is studded with peacemaking deals, from the Iranian nuclear agreement, to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, to the re-opening of relations with Cuba, and to now the accord on climate change. His first term brought us the Affordable Care Act. When are we going to back off our disappointment at his clear lack of bombast?"

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Why Do So Many People Want So Little From the Agreement With Iran?

| September 15, 2015

"...[K]eeping Iran at arm's length (or worse) reduces U.S. diplomatic leverage and flexibility. As long as U.S. Middle East policy remains fixated on its 'special relationships' with Israel, Saudi Arabia, and to some extent Egypt, these states will continue to take U.S. support for granted and ignore U.S. preferences more often than we'd like. But if the United States had decent working relations with every state in the region — including Iran — it could work constructively with any or all of them."

Rear view of the U.S. Capitol facing the reflecting pool, January 2, 2000.

CC-BY-SA-3.0

Analysis & Opinions - The Huffington Post

Lemmings in Congress

| August 19, 2015

"I find it inconceivable that not a single Republican lawmaker plans to vote in support of the nuclear deal with Iran....We are light years away from the thinking of the Founding Fathers of a group of disinterested representatives voting for the common good. Also, they did not envisage the position of lawmaker as a lifetime sinecure."